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Old 03-04-2014, 07:15 AM   #1
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DIY Magnetic Oil Filtering

The whole issue of having ferrous damaging materials circulating through the oil to all the tight clearance parts in our expensive engines is alarming.

Taking action to reduce this and extend the life of the engine is inexpensive and easy for the DIYer.

Another thread brought the issue of "MagFilters" to light and after a few minutes of research an easy DIY will soon be at hand.

Here is how a FilterMag works: Its simply a set of magnets externally attached to the oil filter. The magnetic field extends to the interior of the oil filter and captures ferrous material as it flows through the filter.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CCimcP-i7bY&feature=player_detailpage

How It Works | FilterMag

Lincoln Navigator with 1500 miles!


88 Jeep CJ5 after 45minutes with Magnets on filter



I would have ordered one from the above site but I don't think they have our filter shape/size plus I was not sure if they used the Hi Temp magnets.

I ordered 14 hi temp magnets that I will attach to the outside of my stock filter. K&J Magnetics - Products $46 Shipped

I think my magnets are also stronger than the commercial product, due to the increased thickness, so that larger particles will be
held secure against the flow stream of the oil.

I went with 14 magnets because I think I recall there are 14 flute surfaces on the plastic filter.

Hi Temp is necessary because many common Magnets loose there Magnetic properties at relatively low temperatures ~175F so I needed the Hi Temp variety that could withstand the Hot Oil temperatures that may exist on the surface of the Oil filter.

Every oil change I can wipe away the accumulated materials so this device should function for the life of this car and more.

Every particle of ferrous material removed from the engine will contribute to the extended life of the engine by reducing the wear rate, so is well worth the minimal cost <$50.

Granted the non ferrous metal, like aluminum, will not be captured but aluminum is not as hard and abrasive as iron and steel particles so at least the most damaging metals will be removed from the engine.

I'll add pictures once I have completed the filter and document the results of filtering over time so we have a reference to compare with.

I already have an oil drain magnet as well and now understand why the price is $25, because the Hi Temp magnets are a Samarium-Cobalt alloy and is simply an expensive material that is also inherently corrosion resistant.

Pics Coming Soon...
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Old 03-05-2014, 01:00 PM   #2
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This is pretty much mostly hype. Oil filter will trap most--surely >95%--of the dangerous stuff.

Lots of engines go hundreds of thousands of miles without magnets in their oil.
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Old 03-05-2014, 02:00 PM   #3
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I think I have to agree with lkchris, don't really need the magnets when the filter is there already doing the same thing - stopping metal flakes AND other non-magnetic debris, like aluminum, dirt, etc from getting into the engine.
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Old 03-05-2014, 02:27 PM   #4
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I think what you are missing is that the magnet catch and build up ferrous debris that has a particle size is too small to be captured by the OEM filter, and which would continue to circulate around the engine if the magnets were not there, and which act as a very fine continuous abrasive. Filter magnets have been used for years in aircraft engines to remove this fine grit before it does any damage.
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Old 03-05-2014, 03:34 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by JFP in PA View Post
I think what you are missing is that the magnet catch and build up ferrous debris that has a particle size is too small to be captured by the OEM filter, and which would continue to circulate around the engine if the magnets were not there, and which act as a very fine continuous abrasive. Filter magnets have been used for years in aircraft engines to remove this fine grit before it does any damage.
Agreed, especially when engine integrity and longevity are paramount to the owner. Like light aircraft owners, truck fleet operators, and M96/97 engine owners.

Just sayin'............

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Old 03-05-2014, 05:03 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by JFP in PA View Post
I think what you are missing is that the magnet catch and build up ferrous debris that has a particle size is too small to be captured by the OEM filter, and which would continue to circulate around the engine if the magnets were not there, and which act as a very fine continuous abrasive. Filter magnets have been used for years in aircraft engines to remove this fine grit before it does any damage.
JFP,

Do you know what particle size will pass through the stock OEM paper filter?
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Old 03-05-2014, 06:59 PM   #7
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I always wondered if you use a filter magnet and then send your oil out for analysis if you the readings are accurate due to the metals picked up by the magnets?
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Old 03-05-2014, 08:29 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JFP in PA View Post
I think what you are missing is that the magnet catch and build up ferrous debris that has a particle size is too small to be captured by the OEM filter, and which would continue to circulate around the engine if the magnets were not there, and which act as a very fine continuous abrasive. Filter magnets have been used for years in aircraft engines to remove this fine grit before it does any damage.
I understand, just figured the Porsche engineers took this into consideration when designing the engines. I don't know if the OEM filters block particles smaller than 20 microns or not (I know some filters come in 10 or 20 micron versions) but if they use them on aircraft, then maybe it's not a bad idea.
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Old 03-06-2014, 02:05 AM   #9
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JFP,

Do you know what particle size will pass through the stock OEM paper filter?
I think the OEM filter is in the 40-45 micron pore diameter range, or at least there were the last time we checked.
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Old 03-06-2014, 02:07 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by steved0x View Post
I always wondered if you use a filter magnet and then send your oil out for analysis if you the readings are accurate due to the metals picked up by the magnets?
How can that be? The metals were already there, magnets or not; and if anything, the magnet is taking metal out of the oil............
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Old 03-06-2014, 02:09 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by jc986 View Post
I understand, just figured the Porsche engineers took this into consideration when designing the engines. I don't know if the OEM filters block particles smaller than 20 microns or not (I know some filters come in 10 or 20 micron versions) but if they use them on aircraft, then maybe it's not a bad idea.
As mentioned, the OEM filter has a larger pore diameter than that, although you can get aftermarket units in the OEM cartridge style, or spin on's, with pore diameters in the 25-28 micron range.
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Old 03-06-2014, 06:01 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by JFP in PA View Post
How can that be? The metals were already there, magnets or not; and if anything, the magnet is taking metal out of the oil............
I think the gentleman is saying that with the filter mag the contaminate particles are are removed from suspension in the oil to certain degree. An oil analysis will then indicate less wear contaminants than it would have without the filter mag in place (depending upon how an oil analysis is conducted).

With that said you will certainly be able to scrape off residue in your filter housing and dump it in your sample so you can see what the source is. The fine pickup being better than a chip detector.

One also has to consider that your oil is now circulating "healthier" with the magnet in place and perhaps that might be valuable analysis trend information as far as oil change intervals go.
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Old 03-06-2014, 06:13 AM   #13
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I just can't see where taking out very small magic particles/bits would hurt anything. And might add to the life of the engine. But then again if it was THE answer to wear -you would find more magnets in cars and filters.

For example in an RV fridge- there is an anode rod the attracts corrosion. It's in all fridges. There could easily be a removable magnetic rod in the sump that you pull and wipe off at filter change time.

This might prove the magnet: find a car with a couple oil analysis to get a trend. Then add magnets- and see if there are changes or improvements.

BTW I put a magnet on the oil filter of Honda motorcycle back in the 80's so it's not a new discovery. And my dad installed a Frantz oil filter on all our cars in the 60's. it was my job to change the toilet paper cartridges- what a mess.
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Old 03-06-2014, 06:22 AM   #14
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I just figured that the less abrasive in the engine the longer things will last and retain tighter clearances and better performance, particularly the IMS bearing and all the other bearing supported parts in the engine.

Its also a known fact that the stock filter bypasses some of the oil past the filter element so you are in fact getting ALL the different sized particles suspended in the oil going through all your bearings etc.

You can buy the LN spin on filter at over $150 to help minimize this problem or you can remove the problem. which is the metal suspended in the oil.

For under $50 I have a device that will reduce wear and last for the life of this car and many others.

I'd say the return on investment is very high considering how expensive our engines are and the high revs we are subjecting it to. The faster it turns the quicker it will wear.

I'm also a pilot/aircraft maintainer so I know the benefit is there. Its a simple cheap improvement that will not void any warranty and solves a problem instead of diminishing the impact.

As you can see from the pictures these do work quite well and can help every engine last longer.

You simply wipe the metal off the magnets at each oil change and you have done your preventive maintenance.

With the spin on its a bit more hassle because you'd have to reattach the magnets to the new filter with a couple zip ties.

I'll post pictures of the results at every oil change and I guess in a couple years we can draw conclusions at how effective this device is at removing metal particulates from the engine over time.

I suppose I could collect the metal and weigh it at each oil change to see if the rate of collection and engine wear is changing.
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Old 03-06-2014, 06:36 AM   #15
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I just can't see where taking out very small magic particles/bits would hurt anything. And might add to the life of the engine. But then again if it was THE answer to wear -you would find more magnets in cars and filters.
...
BTW I put a magnet on the oil filter of Honda motorcycle back in the 80's so it's not a new discovery. And my dad installed a Frantz oil filter on all our cars in the 60's. it was my job to change the toilet paper cartridges- what a mess.
The problem of this thing as a commercial product is that they never wear out if you use the High temp magnets, so you only ever make 1 sale to a customer.

Its not new technology, just something so obviously good with no negatives that like you said, it ought to be on every engine and especially those with high engine repair costs.

You can't argue with the "Return on Investment" because if it extends the engine life to the next owner or saves you an engine overhaul or IMS Failure then its paid for itself 100 - 200 times.

I think we will all be surprised at what comes out of an engine at every oil change.
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Old 03-06-2014, 07:30 AM   #16
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I was recently looking into a magnetic drain plug, but decided against it. The reason being I read a significant amount about how some people are weary that the magnet attracts metal (assuming there is any) and the particles build up into a mound, and then break off all at once, causing a large number of particles to enter the engine all at once, instead of individually.

Do you guys think there is any truth to that though? I think that would only apply to the drain plug, but I am curious what people think. Any recommendations on better oil filters, than OEM, to trap more particles? Thanks!
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Old 03-06-2014, 08:35 AM   #17
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Great idea, should improve the filtration without restricting the oil flow. I'm going to give it a try.

Both my motorbikes have magnetic drain plugs and its always reassuring when I check and find no, or very little wear debris.
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Old 03-06-2014, 08:53 AM   #18
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BTW I put a magnet on the oil filter of Honda motorcycle back in the 80's so it's not a new discovery. And my dad installed a Frantz oil filter on all our cars in the 60's. it was my job to change the toilet paper cartridges- what a mess.
And World War II fighter planes had them as well...........
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Old 03-06-2014, 09:10 AM   #19
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I was recently looking into a magnetic drain plug, but decided against it. The reason being I read a significant amount about how some people are weary that the magnet attracts metal (assuming there is any) and the particles build up into a mound, and then break off all at once, causing a large number of particles to enter the engine all at once, instead of individually.

Do you guys think there is any truth to that though? I think that would only apply to the drain plug, but I am curious what people think. Any recommendations on better oil filters, than OEM, to trap more particles? Thanks!
I've personally never heard that one before, but I do not think it has merit as once the fine particles are "agglomerated" on the magnet, any chunk that came loose (if it actually happens) would be more than large enough for the filter to trap. Magnetic drain plugs are widely used on gas and diesel engines, and I have never heard of the type of failure you are suggesting.

There are many filter choices in the aftermarket that offer smaller pore sizes than the OEM cartridges style filter, just do some research on their specs and you will find that filters like Wix/NAPA Gold filters are substantially better in this department, and about half the price of the OEM filter as well. Just don't fall for the "high priced" big name brands hype, you can get as good or better a filter for much less.

Another consideration would be to get rid of your OEM oil bypass, which tends to stick open and allow crud of all sizes to circulate indiscriminately.
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Old 03-10-2014, 06:13 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by rick3000 View Post
I was recently looking into a magnetic drain plug, but decided against it. The reason being I read a significant amount about how some people are weary that the magnet attracts metal (assuming there is any) and the particles build up into a mound, and then break off all at once, causing a large number of particles to enter the engine all at once, instead of individually.

Do you guys think there is any truth to that though? I think that would only apply to the drain plug, but I am curious what people think. Any recommendations on better oil filters, than OEM, to trap more particles? Thanks!
Since you would remove the metal debris from the magnet at every oil change there should not be any accumulation large enough to significantly "mound" up to the point where the magnet cannot hold it.

However, the filter would be next in the oil circuit and capture the metal in case what you say is possible.

If you did ever have a mound of metal accumulate between oil changes then its likely your engine would already be in very bad shape and immediate tear down and overhaul would likely be required to avoid a catastrophic failure.
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