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Old 11-26-2013, 06:46 PM   #1
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Install of TuneRS DOF for IMS Bearing

Wow, lots of debate about the new TuneRS Direct Oil Feed (DOF) system for the IMS bearing over in this thread:

Pedros Techno DOF IMS fix?

Details on the product are here:

DIRECT OIL FEED (DOF) FOR IMS BEARINGS | TuneRS Motorsports

I'm not going to add to the debate in this thread, instead I'm going to show the install on one of my personal vehicles, discuss my impressions of the system, and share some insight into how to make the install easier.

I plan to install a kit on my Gemballa 2000 Boxster S as funds permit, but for now I installed a TuneRS DOF kit on my TechArt 2003 Carrera 4S instead. This car is nice: turbo brakes, turbo AWD, full leather, carbon fiber interior bits, Fabspeed exhaust bypass, TechArt body kit, TechArt coilovers, stereo system, etc. When doing a risk versus cost analysis on this car I felt it is certainly worth $800 to make sure I have no engine issues with the IMS bearing. I plan to keep this car for a couple decades, so this is an investment in peace of mind for me.

Here is the car as it sat, just before I dropped the transmission.





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2000 Boxster S - Gemballa body kit, GT3 front bumper, JRZ coilovers, lower stress bars
2003 911 Carrera 4S - TechArt body kit, TechArt coilovers, HRE wheels
1986 911 Carrera Targa - 3.2L, Euro pistons, 964 cams, steel slant nose widebody
1975 911S Targa - undergoing a full restoration and engine rebuild
Also In The Garage - '66 912, '69 912, '72 914 Chalon wide body, '73 914

Last edited by Kirk; 11-26-2013 at 07:29 PM.
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Old 11-26-2013, 06:59 PM   #2
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First of all I dropped the transmission, which is probably more tricky on the 911 than the Boxster/Cayman due to access in the middle of the car. I think it will be quicker on my Boxster because I can drop the rear bumper and exhaust pretty quick and get much, much easier access to the transmission. Complicating things on my car was the fact that it is AWD and I had to deal with the drive shaft going to the front wheels. Honestly, with all of the work involved in installing the DOF system the most time consuming was just removing the transmission to begin with! My car has 55K miles on it and the clutch was pretty worn, so I am replacing the clutch while I am in there.

This is one thing I like about the DOF flange. Look at the hole that the oil squirts out of. It's relatively small. I dont' think you need tons and tons of oil for this one bearing, just a reliable, consistent source. I think this small stream of oil will be perfect.



Getting the trans, clutch, and flywheel out, this is what I found.



The rear main seal was weeping a little bit of oil



But it looks like the IMS flange is leaking a lot more oil. My car had a flange with updated seal, but obviously it did not hold up over the last ten years.





The new DOF flange with updated seal will help with this problem, but I'll also install a new, updated RMS seal as well, bought from Pelican Parts (along with flywheel bolts, clutch bolts, and the new Spec clutch).
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2000 Boxster S - Gemballa body kit, GT3 front bumper, JRZ coilovers, lower stress bars
2003 911 Carrera 4S - TechArt body kit, TechArt coilovers, HRE wheels
1986 911 Carrera Targa - 3.2L, Euro pistons, 964 cams, steel slant nose widebody
1975 911S Targa - undergoing a full restoration and engine rebuild
Also In The Garage - '66 912, '69 912, '72 914 Chalon wide body, '73 914
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Old 11-26-2013, 07:16 PM   #3
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Now I have to say that the TuneRS instructions are AMAZING!!! Both LN Engineering with their IMS Retrofit and TuneRS with their DOF say that you should have them professionally installed. But the TuneRS kit definitely seems more suited for the do-it-yourself home mechanic as it is really complete (they even include red thread locker) and their instructions are 65 pages full of detailed photos. Let that sink if for a second... The LN Engineering IMS Retrofit comes with one page of instructions, no photos. The TuneRS kit has 65 PAGES!!! Plus there is a You Tube install video. You can't go wrong...

A couple of points to help others though - they talk about finding TDC on the crank. Here's a picture showing the notch lined up at TDC.



Also, when removing the cam plugs, there is a hole in the middle. It's easiest to just puncture that hole (you're going to replace them any way) with a pick and pry them out... easy!



Another suggestion, when installing the bearing onto the center shaft, use a square, calipers, whatever you've got, to check and make sure it is seated perfectly square. Here is what I used to check all of the way around the bearing to make sure it was seated perfectly.



Here is the bearing I'm using - a SKF 6204 2RSH JEM bearing. Don't use an old production bearing. SKF updated their seals, so make sure it says RSH, which is the new seal that can withstand higher pressures. 2RSH means there are two seals, obviously I removed the one that will get the oil spray. JEM means that it is a C3 tolerance bearing. You want C3 as stock OEM was C3. All this means is that the tolerances of the bearing are set to account for thermal expansion. This bearing will get hot, so you need to have tolerances for thermal expansion.

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2000 Boxster S - Gemballa body kit, GT3 front bumper, JRZ coilovers, lower stress bars
2003 911 Carrera 4S - TechArt body kit, TechArt coilovers, HRE wheels
1986 911 Carrera Targa - 3.2L, Euro pistons, 964 cams, steel slant nose widebody
1975 911S Targa - undergoing a full restoration and engine rebuild
Also In The Garage - '66 912, '69 912, '72 914 Chalon wide body, '73 914
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Old 11-26-2013, 07:20 PM   #4
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One thing to note, the TuneRS bearing shaft still has the o-ring in the shaft like stock, but the threaded portion is a much larger diameter to make the shaft much stronger than stock. They also use a two o-ring system to seal the shaft against the DOF cover.

When installing the snap ring on the bearing I placed a nut and bolt on the end of the bearing flange just to help make sure the snap ring didn't go flying off into the engine.



Now TuneRS says to grind out the place where the oil hose will connect to the DOF flange. You can go to your local hardware store, like I did, and pick up some of these $6 rotary files to make this job easy.



I ended up going an even easier route though. I took the bearing flange off, installed some set screws to help guide the DOF flange, and I test fitted the DOF flange and marked off precisely where I would need a hole. I then just drilled out the hole working up progressively from small drill bits up to 5/8" final. It only took me then about 30 minutes to test fit, mark, and drill the hole for the oil line.



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2000 Boxster S - Gemballa body kit, GT3 front bumper, JRZ coilovers, lower stress bars
2003 911 Carrera 4S - TechArt body kit, TechArt coilovers, HRE wheels
1986 911 Carrera Targa - 3.2L, Euro pistons, 964 cams, steel slant nose widebody
1975 911S Targa - undergoing a full restoration and engine rebuild
Also In The Garage - '66 912, '69 912, '72 914 Chalon wide body, '73 914
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Old 11-26-2013, 07:25 PM   #5
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DONE!!! This wasn't meant to be a detail by detail description of the install. That's all covered in those 65 pages of instructions! But I've highlighted some of the important parts of the install. I got the DOF flange on and the oil line run to the oil pickup point. It's tight to get in there, but I got it. It was easier for me to thread the hose onto the adapter at the oil pickup first and leave it just one turn from fully tight. I could then thread in the adapter and do the final tightening on the hose. I also installed a new RMS seal. Before running the car I rotated the crank several times to make sure that timing was not off so bad as to cause a valve to hit. Finally I installed the flywheel and ran the car to make sure I did not have any leaks. Looked really good!





I bought the Spec clutch from Pelican and I had called them to see exactly what the clutch kit came with as the on-line description is vague. Pelican customer support told me it was only the clutch and pressure plate. But while I had been waiting on their return call I called Spec directly and confirmed with them that their kit also included the pilot bearing, throw out bearing, and alignment tool, which it did.



The pilot bearing included in the kit though was a 6002Z bearing of unknown quality. The Z means that it has metal shields whereas rubber seals would be better in this application. The stock pilot bearing for my 2003 996 C4S was bigger, it was a 6202 bearing with rubber seals. As luck would have it I had a few of these in my shop as it's the same bearing that goes into air cooled 911 steering racks and I had just recently rebuilt a steering rack. So I installed a SKF 6202 2RS JEM bearing - same as stock, but better quality.



I've driven the car now without any issues. As the weather is finally getting colder in Texas I will probably be putting up my 914 daily driver (it has no heat or defrost) and driving this car more. A check of cam deviations with my Durametric tool showed normal, which means I didn't screw up and skip time on the chain with the install. I also don't have any oil leaks. My stress test was to run the car up to 140 MPH, which it did without breaking a sweat. I need to break in the clutch though before really abusing the car, which I normally do as a matter of course, not just for testing.

Overall I am very pleased with the quality of the parts in the DOF kit. The install is certainly time consuming, but not really that challenging. Again, the hardest part for me was just getting the darn transmission out of the tight hole it was in! Installing the DOF was pretty straight forward in comparison.

Now, will I install one on my 2000 Boxster S??? YOU BET!
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2000 Boxster S - Gemballa body kit, GT3 front bumper, JRZ coilovers, lower stress bars
2003 911 Carrera 4S - TechArt body kit, TechArt coilovers, HRE wheels
1986 911 Carrera Targa - 3.2L, Euro pistons, 964 cams, steel slant nose widebody
1975 911S Targa - undergoing a full restoration and engine rebuild
Also In The Garage - '66 912, '69 912, '72 914 Chalon wide body, '73 914
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Old 11-26-2013, 08:43 PM   #6
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Nice work! Thanks for sharing. How did the internals of the old IMS look?
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Old 11-27-2013, 06:23 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Porsche9 View Post
Nice work! Thanks for sharing. How did the internals of the old IMS look?
It didn't look like my bearing was going to fail immediately. The seals looked fine from the outside, but they had in fact been compromised. There was no grease in the bearing, just a bit of oil and the IMS shaft was full of oil. There was a bit of wobble in the bearing from wear. So although it didn't look like it was going to fail soon, with the seal compromised and poor lubrication I imagine it was just a matter of time. I think exposure to the hot oil in the sump really does those seals in. In comparison the pilot bearing on the flywheel was just as old, but when I removed the seal from it just to look I found it packed with clean, lifetime grease. The difference - the environment where the seal and bearing sit. No oil or excessive heat at the center of the flywheel...

Kirk
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2000 Boxster S - Gemballa body kit, GT3 front bumper, JRZ coilovers, lower stress bars
2003 911 Carrera 4S - TechArt body kit, TechArt coilovers, HRE wheels
1986 911 Carrera Targa - 3.2L, Euro pistons, 964 cams, steel slant nose widebody
1975 911S Targa - undergoing a full restoration and engine rebuild
Also In The Garage - '66 912, '69 912, '72 914 Chalon wide body, '73 914
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Old 11-27-2013, 07:16 AM   #8
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Nice write up! Love the body kit on the car, Kirk.
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Old 11-27-2013, 01:15 PM   #9
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Lots of good tips- thanks Kirk and may I say, nice stable!

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