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Old 11-15-2017, 09:52 AM   #1
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Ignition Lock Cylinder

After replacing the switch and shooting a little PTFE lube down the key slot, turning the key especially in cold weather is still really hard. Everything else works fine. I do not want to replace the cylinder and have to rekey or reprogram anything. My question is this... If I remove the lock cylinder, clean and lube it externally and then reinstall it, will I need to have the keys reprogrammed? Will the car even recognize that anything has been done to the cylinder?

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Old 11-15-2017, 10:16 AM   #2
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The key communicates thru the transponder. You can remove the lock with no worries. If you have a good locksmith nearby, take it to him. They can completely disassemble the lock and clean for you. I do have to ask though, are you rocking the wheel back and forth as you attempt to turn the key?
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Old 11-15-2017, 11:55 AM   #3
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Nope, no rocking and the wheel isn't locked. It's always been a little difficult to turn but in could weather, at times, it feels as though I could snap the key off in it, it's gotten so stiff. This was the primary reason I changed out the electrical portion of the switch last week. Thanks for the response. I may take it to a locksmith or may try what some have suggested online which is to flush the lock through the key slot with lots and wd40 and then lube it up, again through the key slot with the Triflow PTFE lubricant. I'll let you know how it works out or if I'm riding with Urber for awhile!
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Old 11-16-2017, 12:43 AM   #4
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Nope, no rocking and the wheel isn't locked. It's always been a little difficult to turn but in could weather, at times, it feels as though I could snap the key off in it, it's gotten so stiff. This was the primary reason I changed out the electrical portion of the switch last week. Thanks for the response. I may take it to a locksmith or may try what some have suggested online which is to flush the lock through the key slot with lots and wd40 and then lube it up, again through the key slot with the Triflow PTFE lubricant. I'll let you know how it works out or if I'm riding with Urber for awhile!
Don't use WD40. Use lock lubricants. WD40 dries out and becomes sticky. Use light machine oil instead.
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Old 11-18-2017, 09:56 AM   #5
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Well, took the lock cylinder out today. Flushed it thoroughly with some throttle body cleaner and you would not believe the gunk that came out. Should have taken a photo. Lot's of black sludge probably brass shavings from the key over 16 years of use. Some small metal shavings from the cylinder rubbing on the housing too. Once cleaned, I lubed it up liberally with PTFE and man what a difference. This thing operates smoother than butter. The only weird thing was the windows wouldn't drop automatically once I reconnected the battery. Had to drop the top and I guess it "relearned" the sequence. Work fine now. It's not a hard job to do just takes some patience and a little finesse working in a small space. Thanks again for the comments.
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Old 02-27-2018, 01:03 PM   #6
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I have the same "hard to turn" issue with my ignition key in the cold weather. I'd like to pull out the lock and clean it as others have.........Question, How do I remove the ignition lock mechanisim?......thanks in advance.
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Old 02-27-2018, 05:08 PM   #7
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The only issue I think you will run into is disconnecting the small electrical connector on the cylinder. There is absolutely NO play inthe length of that wire. Anyway, here is what I did...
1. Disconnected the battery just so I didn't start it by accident.
2. Removed the rubber grommet surrounding the key lock with a plastic tool.
3. Inserted the key and turned it to the first position.
4. Took a large paperclip, straightened it out and inserted it into the small hole in the ring that surrounds the key. It's a little awkward 'cause the key fob is so fat. The hole was in the 1 o'clock position.
5. I had to wiggle and play with it a little to get it to release from the barrel. I have also read later that the small hole can be manipulated to be in the 7 o'clock position which makes it easier but I don't know how to get it there.
6. Sooner or later the cylinder will release from the barrel but be careful at his point and don't pull on the wire connector too hard. You will need to disconnect the small electrical connector from the wire and the wire is not very long. It is sitting on the top of the cylinder. I had to take some small needle nose pliers to reach the connector and release it. Make sure to leave the paper clip in the hole.
7. Used spray cleaner to flush the cylinder many many times.
8. Once dry, I then flooded the cylinder with a PTFE lubricant. I think I actually used my cycling lube.
9. Reconnect the electrical connection. Patience is key.
10. Insert the cylinder in the barrel. Wiggle and it will eventually go.
11. Remove the paper clip.
12. Replace the grommet and battery.
13. Start her up.

I also lube my key periodically now as well. It still operates smoothly and it "clicks" off much quicker than it use to when the key is removed. Good luck, and sorry I didn't take photos.
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Old 02-27-2018, 05:25 PM   #8
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Thanks for the very complete reply...itís appreciated. Maybe I should have asked this first:.......why remove the lock to lubricate it?...canít it be sprayed in place? I assume lock cleaner might drip out and hit the floor of the car but thatís easily prevented by covering. So whatís the advantage to removing the cylinder? Thanks again
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Old 02-28-2018, 08:15 AM   #9
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Thanks for the very complete reply...itís appreciated. Maybe I should have asked this first:.......why remove the lock to lubricate it?...canít it be sprayed in place? I assume lock cleaner might drip out and hit the floor of the car but thatís easily prevented by covering. So whatís the advantage to removing the cylinder? Thanks again
Curious about this too.
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Old 02-28-2018, 11:22 AM   #10
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Good question. I knew that after 17 years of use the cylinder probably had a lot of metal shavings and trash in it. I wanted to really FLUSH it out well so I had to remove it to avoid a mess in the car.

I flushed the cylinder for a good 30 minutes by spraying cleaner in it over and over and over again. You will not believe the amount of shavings, dirt and crud that will come out of that thing. Once cleaned I then lubricated it as liberally with PTFE by flooding it as well. I now periodically place a VERY small amount of lubricant on the key maybe once a month.

This is probably only a temporary solution but it's still working well. One thing I may have missed is that I think I also removed the drivers air vent just to give me a little more access but I don't think it is actually if you have small hands.

You can do it just use patience and take your time. Good luck!
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Old 03-04-2018, 12:19 PM   #11
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Well......I went the "easy" route. I didn't remove the cylinder. Just sprayed a good amount of 3-In-1 lock lubricant in the tumbler section then used several firm bristle pipe cleaners to pull out whatever junk had collected in my 20 year old Boxsters lignition lock. Surprisingly, very very little (if any) brass filings came out....lots of dark colored stain on the pipe cleaner but not much else. One slight issue I couldn't resolve was to get the little "door", that covers the key slot to snap shut. It eventually closes about 1/2 way so I'm guessin the spring mechanisim is shot.
My goal was to make the key turn easier in cold weather......but the good thing for me is the car is pretty much stored in the cold weather....it's just my summer "blue sky" car.
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Old 03-04-2018, 04:41 PM   #12
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That will work too. I bought my car for a reasonable price with the idea that I would use it to learn as much as possible, and in as much detail as possible, before I "invest" in what I really want. Glad to say that I have really enjoyed this little car which has given me hardly any trouble at all. All that to say that I go into way more detail than is probably necessary but I am getting to know this thing REALLY well.

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