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Old 12-06-2016, 05:09 PM   #1
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An unorthodox method of replacing a wheel bearing

Here is my question: Would it be cheaper and quicker to switch out the entire wheel carrier with a used one or just replace the wheel bearing on the original wheel carrier?
1. I’ve researched this via my Bentley Manual, my 101 Projects for Your Porsche Boxster book, this forum and the technical articles on the Pelican website.
2. It appears that I will have to take the wheel carrier off in order to punch out the old wheel bearing and to push in the new wheel bearing. So why not just replace the original wheel carrier with another one and do away with putting in a new wheel bearing.
I say this because my 1999 Boxster has over 290,000 miles and the front driver’s side wheel bearing is bad (I can hear it and feel it as I drive). My goal is to reach 300,000 miles without going broke.
MNC-I

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Old 12-06-2016, 06:03 PM   #2
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You can certainly swap carriers and it will be quicker as you will spend no time on the bearing R/R. Problem is $$. Used hubs are not cheap and will come with questionable bearings. New hubs are $$$.
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Old 12-06-2016, 06:18 PM   #3
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OTC grappler arm plus harbor freight FWD bearing puller kit is probably the cheapest way without using a slide hammer. A slide hammer loaner tool plus a bearing puller loaner tool (if available) would be free. With both of these you (since you said front) would only need to remove the pinch bolt at the top of the front drop link and then slide the wheel carrier down a little, vs removing the tie rod end (can be easy) and the lca ball joint end (can be very hard, especially if it is the original one).

With a used hub, who knows what type of bearing you are getting?
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Old 12-06-2016, 08:13 PM   #4
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Harbor freight

I replaced both my rear bearings without breaking down the hub. I used the bearing puller and a large bearing separator.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D4PK1jXhppE

Freeze your new bearings for a day before you install them
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Old 12-07-2016, 03:25 AM   #5
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I would talk to Woody about a new hub. I got one from him for a very reasonable price for another issue.
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Old 12-07-2016, 06:15 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by Pdwight View Post
I replaced both my rear bearings without breaking down the hub. I used the bearing puller and a large bearing separator.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D4PK1jXhppE

Freeze your new bearings for a day before you install them
Using the lug bolts to pull the hub using a big bearing separator to back it up is a good idea too, and you can usually get that tool as a loaner from your local auto parts store.
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Old 12-07-2016, 06:58 AM   #7
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Freeze bearings and the hub. Heat the housing with a propane torch/heat gun to raise the temp a bit and let it grow. Every little bit will help ease the install.
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Old 12-07-2016, 07:53 AM   #8
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I used anti-seize on the inner part of the wheel carrier that receives the bearing and a little on inside of the wheel bearing before pressing the hub in. Although the fronts were very easy to press the hub, much easier than the backs for some reason.


One thing not discussed so far, when you pull the hub it often destroys the wheel bearing and leaves one half of the inner race on the hub. A loaner tool 3 jaw puller plus some sort of plate to fit on the hub for the nose of the puller to push against (you can get from a loner tool set as well, I got mine from a Honda kit for something but they also had a set of bearing race plates) can be used to pull the inner race off the hub after pulling the hub, assuming that the wheel bearing doesn't stay intact, which it sometimes does on the fronts.
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Old 12-07-2016, 09:07 AM   #9
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I used anti-seize on the inner part of the wheel carrier that receives the bearing and a little on inside of the wheel bearing before pressing the hub in.
Always an excellent idea; I might add that this is a good application for nickel based anti seize, which has very high temperature (> 2400F) and corrosion (salt, acids, etc.) resistance.
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Old 12-07-2016, 05:47 PM   #10
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Always an excellent idea; I might add that this is a good application for nickel based anti seize, which has very high temperature (> 2400F) and corrosion (salt, acids, etc.) resistance.
Totally agree with Jeff. I simply left my rear bearings in the freezer, when I was ready to press them in I used antiseize and they went in slick as snott. Of course here in Alabama it was nearly 100 degrees for the press in.
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Old 12-08-2016, 05:36 PM   #11
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Thanks for all of your comments and recommendations.

I spoke to Woody and I am going to go ahead and just buy a new wheel bearing and have it installed.

Thanks again.

MNC-I
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Old 12-08-2016, 06:54 PM   #12
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Not quite sure of what the purists will say but here's a bump hoping for a reply from the more experienced members/Porsche mechanics and DIY'ers.

Awesome miles btw!
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Old 12-08-2016, 09:25 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mnc-i View Post
Thanks for all of your comments and recommendations.

I spoke to Woody and I am going to go ahead and just buy a new wheel bearing and have it installed.

Thanks again.

MNC-I
If you need the B-90 tool, just let me know.
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Old 12-09-2016, 08:06 PM   #14
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Meir you are a Prince among men

When you buy a bearing buy good stuff...Timken, FAG etc. For the cost difference you might as well install a premium product

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