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Old 11-11-2016, 05:31 PM   #1
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Thumbs up Basic tools needed for DYI projects

Trying to put together a basic list of tools & items needed for basic maintenance & DYI projects
I'd prefer good tools - middle of the road Between harbor freight & snap on quality / price if there is such a thing
I have a good ratchet set , torx sockets , screw drivers that's about it.
Need hydrolic jack , jack stands , torque wrench,breaker bar , oil pan and just about everything else !!
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Old 11-11-2016, 05:55 PM   #2
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Both Lowe's Kobalt and HD's Husky brands are good quality tools that will last and companies that will stand behind their tools if they fail.

Harbor Freight has it's place for oddball things that you don't use everyday. I have several things from HF that are really good quality and am very pleased with them. They have a door panel pliers that works great. I have used it several times for window regulator work. Less than $10.

IMHO, buy as good as you can afford. If you buy cheap, you may end up replacing them down the road.
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Old 11-11-2016, 06:21 PM   #3
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I really depends what kind of maintenance you will be doing.

Here is a list of the things I purchased (does not include basic tools I already owned) when I did my first DIY service (oil change, trans fluid change, motor mount, coolant flush, center radiator install, oil pump piston, serpentine belt, MAF, throttle body removal/cleaning, etc). I spent the money on quality where I thought it would count, the Esco jack stands, the Uview, a Durametric, but I wasn't bothered about the various sockets that will only ever get used a handful of times.

Basic/General Tools, including:
13-19mm Metric Wrenches
Strap Wrench
Torque Wrench
Torx Screwdriver Set
Socket Set w/ Various Attachements

Jacking:
Esco 10498 Jack Stands
Wheel Chocks
Long/Low Harbor Freight Jack, about $150 on sale

Coolant System:
Coolant Hydrometer
Uview Airlift 550000
Hose Clamp Tool

Porsche Specific:
16mm Triple Square Hex (transmission drain bolt)
24mm Socket
Security T20 (MAF)
27mm Deep Socket + Tape (for spin-on oil adapter)
18mm-19mm Sockets
8mm-17mm Sockets
E12 Torx Socket (or 3/8”)
5mm Allen
8mm Allen
17mm Allen
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Last edited by rick3000; 11-11-2016 at 06:23 PM.
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Old 11-11-2016, 07:13 PM   #4
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I like to buy old Craftsman tools. A couple of years ago I bought a complete tool chest full of tools for $350. New it would have cost well over $1,000. Plus the old tools are made better.
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Old 11-11-2016, 08:37 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rick3000 View Post
I really depends what kind of maintenance you will be doing.

Here is a list of the things I purchased (does not include basic tools I already owned) when I did my first DIY service (oil change, trans fluid change, motor mount, coolant flush, center radiator install, oil pump piston, serpentine belt, MAF, throttle body removal/cleaning, etc). I spent the money on quality where I thought it would count, the Esco jack stands, the Uview, a Durametric, but I wasn't bothered about the various sockets that will only ever get used a handful of times.

Basic/General Tools, including:
13-19mm Metric Wrenches
Strap Wrench
Torque Wrench
Torx Screwdriver Set
Socket Set w/ Various Attachements

Jacking:
Esco 10498 Jack Stands
Wheel Chocks
Long/Low Harbor Freight Jack, about $150 on sale

Coolant System:
Coolant Hydrometer
Uview Airlift 550000
Hose Clamp Tool

Porsche Specific:
16mm Triple Square Hex (transmission drain bolt)
24mm Socket
Security T20 (MAF)
27mm Deep Socket + Tape (for spin-on oil adapter)
18mm-19mm Sockets
8mm-17mm Sockets
E12 Torx Socket (or 3/8)
5mm Allen
8mm Allen
17mm Allen
Diddo on this tip; the only thing I would add is to get a sturdy (I like Craftsman) tool box to secure, organize, and store these tools.
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Old 11-12-2016, 04:39 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rick3000 View Post
I really depends what kind of maintenance you will be doing.

Here is a list of the things I purchased (does not include basic tools I already owned) when I did my first DIY service (oil change, trans fluid change, motor mount, coolant flush, center radiator install, oil pump piston, serpentine belt, MAF, throttle body removal/cleaning, etc). I spent the money on quality where I thought it would count, the Esco jack stands, the Uview, a Durametric, but I wasn't bothered about the various sockets that will only ever get used a handful of times.

Basic/General Tools, including:
13-19mm Metric Wrenches
Strap Wrench
Torque Wrench
Torx Screwdriver Set
Socket Set w/ Various Attachements

Jacking:
Esco 10498 Jack Stands
Wheel Chocks
Long/Low Harbor Freight Jack, about $150 on sale

Coolant System:
Coolant Hydrometer
Uview Airlift 550000
Hose Clamp Tool

Porsche Specific:
16mm Triple Square Hex (transmission drain bolt)
24mm Socket
Security T20 (MAF)
27mm Deep Socket + Tape (for spin-on oil adapter)
18mm-19mm Sockets
8mm-17mm Sockets
E12 Torx Socket (or 3/8)
5mm Allen
8mm Allen
17mm Allen
+1 on this starter kit

Now you have a choice of drive set. 1/4, 3/8 or 1/2 inch drives. I suggest to go with 3/8 drives first. However there will be a need for 1/2" and 1/4 drive set.
You will also need socket extension. 2", 5", 10" and a universal. A good breaker bar will also come in handy. Harbor Freight is a good source for this type of tools.
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Old 11-12-2016, 06:48 AM   #7
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Thanks excellent advice - The Torque wrench seems to be a challenge
price range is large- and newton scale instead of ft/lbs any brands to look for on this
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Old 11-12-2016, 06:59 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thstone View Post
I like to buy old Craftsman tools. A couple of years ago I bought a complete tool chest full of tools for $350. New it would have cost well over $1,000. Plus the old tools are made better.
+ 1 on Craftsman

They are not Snap Ons but pretty decent quality, you can buy a pretty decent beginners metric set for about $500, then you will realize that you already bought many more specialized tools
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Old 11-12-2016, 08:43 AM   #9
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i have Craftsman socket set 3/8 & 1/2 metric and sae

need a good torque wrench without breaking the bank
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Old 11-12-2016, 05:05 PM   #10
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In 5 year of doing simple DIY, the tools I used or had were:

Code reader. battery maintainer, charger, security wrench for MAF, O2 sensor removal tool, battery load tester. Set of spare oil drain plug and crush washers, oil drain pan.

I carried in the car excellent heavy long charger cables and a much longer/better wheel nut removal bar and socket that matched the lug bolts (plus make sure you have the lock nut socket if your car's wheels have locks).

Aside from the items I carried in the car, I added to my collection as I needed the tool, I didn't buy in advance much. When I did that, I found I was liable to never use the tool (for example, the battery load tester is still in an unopened box).

As you can see, there weren't a lot of Porsche specific tools.
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Old 11-12-2016, 05:32 PM   #11
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Thanks Mike , good advice
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Old 11-13-2016, 06:21 AM   #12
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10 mm everything, box wrench, open end, socket, deep well socket. T20 star or torx wrench. I have started buying tools from Harbor freight and haven't had any problems with them. I had a Uview airlift but sold it on ebay. I have a 99 and have "burped" the coolant system and it works fine. When I did my brakes I replaced the bleeder valves with speed bleeders from pelican so no facing bleeding thing. I have found these cars are not that difficult to work on and just because there is some fancy expensive device doesn't mean there isn't a lower cost alternative that works just as well or better. When I am going to work on the car I review posts by others that have done the work I am attempting and find out the tools that I need, if I need to buy then I do on an as needed basis.
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Old 11-13-2016, 09:05 AM   #13
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I built myself up a nice set of Snap-On buying used from Ebay, usually at around half the new price. It took a while, but it was fun assembling my collection one or two pieces at a time. Now I have the best and they will last forever.

I love my set of 1/4, 3/8 and 1/2" Snap-on torque wrenches. I had them calibrated as soon as I got them and they will be good for years. I would never trust a PA or HF torque wrench. I hear a few people on here defending them but I think that's because a) that's what they bought and they need to justify their decision to cheap out on a critical tool or b) they just don't know any better.

Flare wrenches are another tool not to cheap out on. Go with Mac or Snap-On or be prepared to deal with rounded-off fittings.
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Old 11-14-2016, 08:51 AM   #14
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actually I bought a torque wrench from harbor freight and returned it. Was junk.
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Old 11-14-2016, 04:33 PM   #15
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Thought of another item. A real air pressure pump with a nice long hose and a good pressure gauge. Actually carry one in every car.
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Old 11-15-2016, 03:32 AM   #16
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I didn't see an extra set of knuckles to replace the ones you have when you bust them while removing a stubborn fastener!
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Old 11-15-2016, 03:40 AM   #17
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Actually get 2 torque wrenches. Many bolts torque to only 7 ft/lb. The 1/2" wrenches only goes down to 20 or 40 ft/lb. Get a good 3/8" and 1/2.
If it doesnt break the bank buy a good set of ratcheting (gearwrench) open/box-end wrenches 8-19mm every size check for the closeness of the ratchet click the smaller movement the better.



These 2 tool are very helpful if working on the suspension. Left tool to pull the control arms and toe links. The right tool mounted to the wheel hub will pop the axles easily.
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Old 11-15-2016, 07:06 AM   #18
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Most Harbor freight tools are fine for the home DIY guy, including their torque wrenches

Would I rebuild an engine with them, probably not, but for most other stuff that you would do DIY, they are fine
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Old 11-15-2016, 09:11 AM   #19
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Confession I was trained as a "fitter' by one of the big Euro auto companies while at university,I am a tool hound and have lots of space for this fix-it hobby. The tool collection is huge. But inadequate for this car !
The problem is access.
Yes ,of course I have several different configurations of the same size wrench but if it does not reach or fit around an obstruction - you need yet another variation of the same 13mm wrench.
Here is an example I bought recently:
https://www.matcotools.com/catalog/product/SRRFXLM52T/5-PIECE-EXTRA-LONG-DOUBLE-BOX-FLEX-HEAD-RATCHETING-WRENCH-SET/
A fellow lister described tracking an elusive CEL to a loose electrical connector deep under the inlet manifold.The only way he could reattach it w/o removing manifold(!!) was to use extra long forceps - I've got them too !
I like tools but on a tight budget this car could be a problem.
If only the rear clamshell was hinged . Some of the Italian exotica have that feature.Pity Porsche did not emulate.
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Old 11-15-2016, 11:13 AM   #20
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When I was a kid and worked in a small garage that worked on mostly old English sports cars. We used to take the odd wrench and make a "Special Tool" by doing things like grinding down the sides of a box end wrench so it would fit in a tight space or heating up a wrench with a torch and bending it. Another special tool we made was to braze the bottom of hollowed out spark plug to a pneumatic air chuck. That was used on engines with worn valve guides that weren't ready for a valve job. Screw it into a cylinder, connect it to a compressor and then remove the valve springs to put those little rubber umbrellas on the valve stems. I don't know if that would work on today's engines, but for engines without overhead cams it worked pretty good!

For the Boxster you may also want some old hockey pucks to put in the pad of your hydraulic jack, depending on the type of jack you have.
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