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Old 01-21-2018, 08:20 PM   #1
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Replace 986 (1999) rear hard brake lines

Hi all - new to the forum. I just acquired my first boxster - car spent it's previous life in Pittsburgh. I took the undertrays off to take a my first good look and I can see that Pennsylvania definitely does NOT spare the road salt....

The hard lines to the rear wheels are basically mush. I cut off the rusted the rusted line that runs through the drivers wheel well to the under the driver's seat, and flared it and used a coupler and new piece of line to complete that part of the circuit.

The driver's side line from the coupler to the caliper I bent a replacement and have that all bolted together. What I am having difficulty with is:

1) How is the line to the PASSENGER rear caliper routed? I can trace it easily from the junction on the drivers side mentioned above as it runs parallel to the blue vacuum line and the rear driver's side line, but then it turns about 30 degrees upwards and continues up through a bulkhead of sorts. I can't splice in a union here as the rustiest section is where it goes through the sheet metal.

2) how do I reach behind wherever this goes? Access via the trunk? I am also assuming that there is some sort of a union back there as I'm hoping (?) that its not a 10 foot total length tube. The PSM cars have some sort of an ABS modulator in PET that serves as a union - do the standard cars have something that sits in it's place to serve as a union

3) Do I have to pull the trans to fix this? If I do, I'm just going to find something out of the way and make some random bends to get it up, over, and down until it's time for the IMS/clutch, and then fix it permanently.


Car is 5 speed - though it appears that these are the same for both transmissions.

Thanks in advance.


Last edited by MattMarks; 01-21-2018 at 09:21 PM.
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Old 03-20-2024, 08:32 AM   #2
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Exact Same problem here. Ohio also doesn't skimp on road salt.

I have the new lines waiting to be installed. I just need to figure out how.
I've done hard line replacements on 4 or 5 cars, just never a 986.

Any Tips, Tricks, Videos, Photos or Tutorials would be appreciated. These new lines are way too expensive to kink up during installation.

thanks!
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Old 03-20-2024, 09:17 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by JP Summers View Post
Exact Same problem here. Ohio also doesn't skimp on road salt.

I have the new lines waiting to be installed. I just need to figure out how.
I've done hard line replacements on 4 or 5 cars, just never a 986.

Any Tips, Tricks, Videos, Photos or Tutorials would be appreciated. These new lines are way too expensive to kink up during installation.

thanks!
On many makes of cars, the brake hardlines are installed while it is a bare chassis, meaning some sections cannot be replaced without substantial disassembly to get the replacement lines in. We have actually seen GM models that require dropping out the engine and transmission cradle in order to replace the passenger side front hard line. When we encounter this problem, we use DOT approved nickel copper replacement lines, which have two major advantages: Then are malleable enough to be formed in place, and they will never rust.
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Old 03-27-2024, 05:31 AM   #4
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I will try my best to explain the rear passenger hardlines. I did this job recently after simply ruining my hardliners.

1. The hard line exits a block on the driver side before the rear wheel. It then goes straight for about 6 inches then traverses upwards with minor bends before making the angle to reach the rear bulkhead behind the engine nearest the throttle body. It then runs across this bulk head angling down gradually then taking a few minor bends to make it to the rear caliper. There is very little interference with any other lines or tubing.

2. I placed the vehicle into the service position. Then I used my quickjacks to place it into the highest position. Removed panels navigating the quickjacks, up and down as needed. From there I released the line from the dividing block on the driver side. I lowered the car slightly to release the line from its retaining clips (white clips along the bulkhead). I did so with nylon tools and very carefully, I was able to save all clips for reause in place. Then I removed the line, obviously it was trash do I did it in a brute fashion.

3. To reinstall the new line (perimeter porsche sourced, double check the bends it can be damaged easily in shipping, I had to go back for a replacement) I recommend releasing the shift cables at the transmission side. I also removed my intake piping from the CAI to the throttle body. This will allow the line to slide down to the bulkhead without interference from any other line or cable. From here I navigated the new line in carefully from the top placing it towards drivers side first. I fed more of the piping towards that side to make the angle needed to then place it against the bulkhead and work it in on the passenger side. I then secured it at the driver side dividing block and pushed it into the clips carefully as not to bend the longer sections in between the clips. Then proceed to replace all other items appropriately. Follow the proper instructions for bleeding the system.

My quickjacks helped a ton especially going up and down. However properly protecting the paint and using a step stool or ladder could make accessing the engine compartment while the vehicle is lifted relatively safe.

I hope this all made sense. Good luck. Definitely doable at home with minimal tools. Buy snap-on wrenches for your brakelines..

Last edited by HorsiesInDaBack; 03-27-2024 at 05:42 AM.
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Old 03-27-2024, 11:55 AM   #5
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I currently have my engine out, I can post pictures of the line routing as described above, if anyone cares to see them.
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Old 03-31-2024, 02:09 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by JFP in PA View Post
On many makes of cars, the brake hardlines are installed while it is a bare chassis, meaning some sections cannot be replaced without substantial disassembly to get the replacement lines in. We have actually seen GM models that require dropping out the engine and transmission cradle in order to replace the passenger side front hard line. When we encounter this problem, we use DOT approved nickel copper replacement lines, which have two major advantages: Then are malleable enough to be formed in place, and they will never rust.
I would absolutely second the use of nickel copper lines. It actually makes me cross that manufacturers put steel lines in. Even as a “retail” customer the cost of nickel copper is so very little more and the adverse impact of using steel on longevity and maintenance costs is very great.
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Old 03-31-2024, 08:29 AM   #7
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I would absolutely second the use of nickel copper lines. It actually makes me cross that manufacturers put steel lines in. Even as a “retail” customer the cost of nickel copper is so very little more and the adverse impact of using steel on longevity and maintenance costs is very great.
Even more peculiar, Asian manufacturer's use mild steel brake hard lines that are coated with a rubber/plastic covering that totally eliminates corrosion. We regularly see a customer's 27-year-old daily driver Nissan that has been exposed to winter road salt since day one, and the original factory mild steel hard lines are in perfect condition. Just a few more cents can make all the difference.....

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