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Old 01-27-2013, 07:33 AM   #1
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Brake fluid flush

I am about to flush my brake fluid for my first time since I bought my 02 S in July. I have a power bleeder and know the sequence as far as the wheels go but my question is: At what point do I bleed the clutch, before or after the wheels or does it really matter? It really doesn't address this in the Bentley manual that i can see. Does anyone recommend a brand of brake fluid that is 'the best'? I am sure JDanger uses yellow fluid. Any things I should be aware of before I tackle this DIY maintenance? Thanks in advance.

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Old 01-27-2013, 08:34 AM   #2
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Old 01-27-2013, 08:42 AM   #3
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IDoes anyone recommend a brand of brake fluid that is 'the best'?
We use ATE Super Blue and Type 200 (same "super DOT 4" fluid, only one has blue dye in it so you can see the change over during a flush).
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Old 01-27-2013, 10:03 AM   #4
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You can bleed the clutch any time, just be sure that the reservoir is completely filled because the line going to the clutch from the reservoir is pretty high up and you can run the clutch circuit dry fairly easily.
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Old 01-27-2013, 10:25 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by san rensho View Post
You can bleed the clutch any time, just be sure that the reservoir is completely filled because the line going to the clutch from the reservoir is pretty high up and you can run the clutch circuit dry fairly easily.
@ San,
Just to clarify, the reservoir we're talking about is the brake fluid reservoir in the frunk, correct?
This is my next "to do" when the garage gets warmer than 40F... winter sucks.

@ Olddude,
This is a really easy-peasy project. I just gravity-flushed my brakes as I'm too bloody cheap to spend the $ on a power bleeder I'll use every second year.
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Old 01-27-2013, 11:54 AM   #6
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Yes, clutch and brakes share the same reservoir.
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Old 01-27-2013, 03:26 PM   #7
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Yes, clutch and brakes share the same reservoir.
^^^This...
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Old 01-28-2013, 12:32 AM   #8
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1olddude - just a word of warning from another old dude - the clutch bleed nipple is a real mongrel to get to - getting an spanner in there plus the bleed line while lying prostrate semi coiled on your cocyx can be challenging....
The second time I bled mine, I removed the triagulated alloy bracing plate (bolted under the gearbox) which made life a lot easier - I was changing the transmission oil at the same service so the plate had to be removed anyway.
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Old 01-28-2013, 02:37 AM   #9
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There is no need to remove anything to beed the clutch, you use a short box wrench and get to it from the driver's rear wheel well. 30 sec. job at best........
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Old 01-28-2013, 04:40 AM   #10
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There is no need to remove anything to beed the clutch, you use a short box wrench and get to it from the driver's rear wheel well. 30 sec. job at best........
It's been awhile since I did mine---so it's probably due to be done!---but I recall this being a difficult reach to accomplish as well, similar to Steve Tinker's experience. Dunno if he (like me) lacks a lift, but maybe that's what makes all the difference between a challenge to get to vs not that bad...
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Old 01-28-2013, 08:46 AM   #11
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It's been awhile since I did mine---so it's probably due to be done!---but I recall this being a difficult reach to accomplish as well, similar to Steve Tinker's experience. Dunno if he (like me) lacks a lift, but maybe that's what makes all the difference between a challenge to get to vs not that bad...
I really don't see what the problem is; here is a 986, on jack stands, looking in from the rear of the driver's side wheel well, the bleeder is marked with an arrow:



I really helps to have a short (3 1/2 inch long) double box wrench to open it as there is not much room to swing the tool, but otherwise it is pretty straight foward.....
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Old 01-28-2013, 09:07 AM   #12
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I really don't see what the problem is; here is a 986, on jack stands, looking in from the rear of the driver's side wheel well, the bleeder is marked with an arrow:



I really helps to have a short (31/2 inch long) double box wrench to open it as there is not much room to swing the tool, but otherwise it is prett straight foward.....
You're no doubt right on this. I've not done a ton of wrenching (none prior to getting the Box), but I have figured out a few things. One is the (seemingly) simple fact that if it's unusually difficult or uncomfortable getting to something, try moving yourself and going at it from an entirely different direction/angle. Maybe I just never did figure out the right approach the day I was bleeding the clutch!
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Old 01-28-2013, 09:27 AM   #13
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It always helps to have already done about a zillion of them. I've always found this to be a "one handed" project (I prefer to do it left handed); put the box wrench on the bleeder, then put the hose on the bleeder, open the bleeder and watch for the fluid color to change, then close the bleeder, pull the hose and remove the wrench. There is no room to get both hands in there at the same time.

It really does not matter if this is done on a lift or on jack stands, just don’t “over-think” it.
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Old 01-28-2013, 02:55 PM   #14
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There is no need to remove anything to beed the clutch, you use a short box wrench and get to it from the driver's rear wheel well. 30 sec. job at best........
See, this is what makes this the best Porsche forum around. Thanks for the tip.
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Old 09-04-2018, 12:12 PM   #15
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I am about to do a brake fluid flush and want to flush the clutch as well.
I have had the car over a year now and don't know the condition of the fluid.
What size "Short stubby" wrench is needed?
Thanks!
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Old 09-04-2018, 12:28 PM   #16
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What size "Short stubby" wrench is needed?
Thanks!
Rob, I believe that you will require a 11 mm wrench.
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Old 09-04-2018, 01:52 PM   #17
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Great.
Thank you Gilles.
I am looking forward to this project - new rotors, pads, hardware, screws, bolts, fluid, the works!
I just rolled over 160k and still going strong.
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Old 09-06-2018, 01:48 PM   #18
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Ok Gang, one more question before I do my first brake job on my 02 Base.
I have bought everything under the sun except some type of anti-squeal product.
Since I bought new dampers for the pistons, do I need to use some type of anti-squeal product on the back of the brake pads like I used to on The American Cars that I have owned?
I'm used to coating the back of the brake pads with that orange goop and I am wondering if I need something similar for this job.
As always, thanks!
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Old 09-07-2018, 06:32 AM   #19
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No, its either or. I gave up on the pistons because they kept getting stuck.
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Old 09-07-2018, 10:40 PM   #20
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Ok Gang, one more question before I do my first brake job on my 02 Base.
I have bought everything under the sun except some type of anti-squeal product.
Since I bought new dampers for the pistons, do I need to use some type of anti-squeal product on the back of the brake pads like I used to on The American Cars that I have owned?
I'm used to coating the back of the brake pads with that orange goop and I am wondering if I need something similar for this job.
As always, thanks!
I had a sequel that I could not get rid of and with only 7 K miles on the pads. I purchased new pads and shims (buffers) for all 4 wheels, I found that the screws in the shims were loose and causing the squeal...the new shims screws were also not tight at all. I used locktite on the screws in the new shims and did the complete brake job....quiet as a church mouse after a year

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