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Old 02-20-2021, 05:07 PM   #1
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Rear triangular plate

Sorry, not sure if the technical name for it, but y'all know what I'm talking about. Here's my question - I know that everyone says it provides structural integrity to the rear running gear. I can see that being the case, at least the front half of the plate that bridges between the wheel carriers. But has anyone ever tried driving without this plate? I recently reinforced the rear end with a 1" aluminum bar and noticed a real difference in the rear end tightness with high g turns. So this makes me wonder whether these reinforcement bars are actually better at controlling "splaying" of the rear suspension better than the plate and would facilitate ditching the thing. That would leave linear motion at play (front to back) but I don't know if that would actually happen since the virtual A frame struts (notably the track arm) would control this.

No real reason to remove the thing other than it was a bit of a pain to get lined up while reassembling the rear end. Asking more out of curiosity.

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Old 02-20-2021, 08:13 PM   #2
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Ike, if you put the weight of the rear axle on it's wheels without the triangle, you may risk trowing off the rear alignment.

The support bar its supposed to be installed along with the triangle (top..??)
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Old 02-21-2021, 05:09 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by Gilles View Post
Ike, if you put the weight of the rear axle on it's wheels without the triangle, you may risk trowing off the rear alignment.



The support bar its supposed to be installed along with the triangle (top..??)
Yeah, that's where I've got mine mounted (above the plate and diagonal bars).

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Old 02-21-2021, 09:06 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ike84 View Post
Sorry, not sure if the technical name for it, but y'all know what I'm talking about. Here's my question - I know that everyone says it provides structural integrity to the rear running gear. I can see that being the case, at least the front half of the plate that bridges between the wheel carriers. But has anyone ever tried driving without this plate? I recently reinforced the rear end with a 1" aluminum bar and noticed a real difference in the rear end tightness with high g turns. So this makes me wonder whether these reinforcement bars are actually better at controlling "splaying" of the rear suspension better than the plate and would facilitate ditching the thing. That would leave linear motion at play (front to back) but I don't know if that would actually happen since the virtual A frame struts (notably the track arm) would control this.

No real reason to remove the thing other than it was a bit of a pain to get lined up while reassembling the rear end. Asking more out of curiosity.

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The reason it is a pain to realign is that when assembled, that aluminum panel is under tension and keeping the uprights in their correct position.
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Old 02-21-2021, 02:03 PM   #5
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The reason it is a pain to realign is that when assembled, that aluminum panel is under tension and keeping the uprights in their correct position.
I guess that I was actually more surprised that it came off without effort. I assumed that things had shifted slightly over the 6 weeks it's been off. Do you normally check alignment after reinstalling it? Is it like other suspension structures that should be torqued after the car is back in the ground. I didn't see that in the workshop manual but I figured it's worth asking.

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Old 02-21-2021, 02:27 PM   #6
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The suspension uprights actually move apart with the plate is removed, and often require the use of a small ratchet strap to pull them back in to reinstall the plate. It can be torqued with the vehicle still in the air.

If the car has been up in the air and the suspension unloaded while the plate was off, usually realignment is not necessary. But if the car has been set on the ground, or driven with it off, alignment is required.
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Old 02-21-2021, 02:58 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by JFP in PA View Post
The suspension uprights actually move apart with the plate is removed, and often require the use of a small ratchet strap to pull them back in to reinstall the plate. It can be torqued with the vehicle still in the air.

If the car has been up in the air and the suspension unloaded while the plate was off, usually realignment is not necessary. But if the car has been set on the ground, or driven with it off, alignment is required.
Thanks man, I appreciate the advice

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