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Old 12-14-2005, 08:23 AM   #1
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Condition your leather seats!

holy cow its cold up here in metro NYC! it was about 10 degrees last night jumped into the car to go watch a movie and noticed the leather was suffering from the extreme weather, looking very dry like your skin gets after spending too much time in below freesing weather. Warmed up the car until it was nice and toasty and got out the Lexol. Instant relief.
Do your Boxster or Boxstore-it a favor and get your seats some relief.
Klasse VLRP is another excellent product for your seats and leather steering wheel
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Old 12-14-2005, 08:51 AM   #2
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An upholstry shop owner told me that none of the expensive internet products work as well as Lexol, which is inexpensive and available most everywhere. I sure wish I'd known this before I bought all that Leatherique product!
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Old 12-14-2005, 09:30 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by RandallNeighbour
An upholstry shop owner told me that none of the expensive internet products work as well as Lexol, which is inexpensive and available most everywhere. I sure wish I'd known this before I bought all that Leatherique product!

Hi,

You didn't make a mistake with Leatherique! I have used all the products out there at one time or another and nothing beats Leatherique. Lexol leaves so much crap (especially silicones) behind that it clogs the pores in the leather and leads to premature Drying and Hardening. I wouldn't use that stuff on a Dog Collar!...

Happy Motoring!... Jim'99
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Old 12-14-2005, 11:53 AM   #4
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Love the Leatherique.

Leatherique is all I use on my seats. It brought my 18 year old, neglected, hard-as-a-rock 928 seats back to life and ready for a re-dye. It keeps the Boxster seats clean and soft with no residue at all.
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Old 12-14-2005, 12:30 PM   #5
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I have read recently that a very good leather care product is Color Plus Leather Care Soffener (spelled correctly!). They have a web-site www.colorplus.com.
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Old 12-15-2005, 11:35 AM   #6
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leatherique is not cheap! a 26 ounce bottle (should last 20 years) with shipping is almost $40!
anyone want to go 50/50?
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Old 12-15-2005, 01:03 PM   #7
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My family were shoemakers long ago, an uncle who is 80 still can fire on a fresh set of soles like factory. He told me Lexol has been around for a long time and is among the best. I use it and I think it works well. Forget about the McGuires leather product, it smells good but I think it actually dries the leather. I'm using it up on the truck seats now...
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Old 12-15-2005, 01:20 PM   #8
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I use both Leatherique and Lexol.

I really like the Leatherique cleaner/light conditioner.

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Old 12-15-2005, 03:20 PM   #9
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I have actually used an Eagle One product some type of conditioner. It works great, smells neutral and doesnt leave a residue. You actually apply it by hand like lotion on skin. Once it is worked into the seats, take a clean towel and buff off the seating surfaces. It was relatively inexpensive 8 to 10 bucks or so. Try it!

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Old 12-16-2005, 06:47 PM   #10
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Hate to burst y'all's bubble on conditioning....

I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but unless you remove the leather from the seats and condition the "raw" back side of the leather, you really are not doing much for your seats by conditioning them. It makes us as car owners feel better that we're doing something, but unfortunately, the effect is negligible.

Leather used for upholstery is dyed with pigment dyes which hides the flaws and the grain in the leather, as opposed to aniline dyes which allow the grain to be seen and the leather to age, darken and develop a patina. Aniline dyes also allow any natural flaws to be visible, which most people don't want to see. Consumers want leather exclusiveness but with "vinyl perfection". So, they use pigment dyes, which is very much like painting your leather with acrylic paint. It coats it, rather than just colouring it.

After dyeing with pigment dye, upholstery leather is then further sealed with lacquer, or similar flexible sealer, so as not to allow spilled drinks, etc. to stain the seats, and to keep the seats from looking worn. It also makes for easy clean up...just like vinyl. Between the pigment dye and the sealer, virtually nothing will soak into the leather...including conditioners, until this sealer coat starts to wear through or crack.... or is removed.

What benefit you are seeing is probably from the massaging action of working the conditioners onto the leather, which, by working the leather with your hands, you are breaking in the leather and keeping it flexible. This is why the driver's seat tends to stay more pliable than the others. Also, in winter, it is the nature of leather to be stiffer than in summer.

Last edited by creseida; 12-16-2005 at 08:57 PM.
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Old 12-17-2005, 02:08 AM   #11
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i used a natural bees wax type of product (heritage) which worked very well with my old savannah interior but haven't done it yet on grey interior of S
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Old 12-17-2005, 05:42 AM   #12
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I use Mcguire's leather wipes. It's simple and works just fine for me.
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Old 12-17-2005, 02:44 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by creseida
I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but unless you remove the leather from the seats and condition the "raw" back side of the leather, you really are not doing much for your seats by conditioning them. It makes us as car owners feel better that we're doing something, but unfortunately, the effect is negligible.

Leather used for upholstery is dyed with pigment dyes which hides the flaws and the grain in the leather, as opposed to aniline dyes which allow the grain to be seen and the leather to age, darken and develop a patina. Aniline dyes also allow any natural flaws to be visible, which most people don't want to see. Consumers want leather exclusiveness but with "vinyl perfection". So, they use pigment dyes, which is very much like painting your leather with acrylic paint. It coats it, rather than just colouring it.

After dyeing with pigment dye, upholstery leather is then further sealed with lacquer, or similar flexible sealer, so as not to allow spilled drinks, etc. to stain the seats, and to keep the seats from looking worn. It also makes for easy clean up...just like vinyl. Between the pigment dye and the sealer, virtually nothing will soak into the leather...including conditioners, until this sealer coat starts to wear through or crack.... or is removed.

What benefit you are seeing is probably from the massaging action of working the conditioners onto the leather, which, by working the leather with your hands, you are breaking in the leather and keeping it flexible. This is why the driver's seat tends to stay more pliable than the others. Also, in winter, it is the nature of leather to be stiffer than in summer.
Hi,

You're correct... to a point. Many Products will not penetrate the various Fillers and Dyes as you mention, but some will. Leatherique is one of these...

Happy Motoring... Jim'99
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Old 12-19-2005, 07:03 PM   #14
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Read the "About Leather" section on colorplus.com. Lexol is little more than a wet wipe down, water based...won't penetrate the leather. Their products are oil based and work marvelously. No affiliation, yada yada...
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Old 12-20-2005, 05:45 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris C Atlanta
Read the "About Leather" section on colorplus.com. Lexol is little more than a wet wipe down, water based...won't penetrate the leather. Their products are oil based and work marvelously. No affiliation, yada yada...
Consider the source. They are selling their products.

I have used both Lexol and Leatherique with good results.

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Old 12-20-2005, 08:29 AM   #16
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Pretty cynical, Bruce. I find their science and insights into leather and leather care excellent. They've been written up in Pano too for years for their products

My personal tests of Lexol and their product show Soffener is light years better and really does penetrate the leather. Believe what you like.
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Old 12-20-2005, 10:17 AM   #17
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To the MN boxer naysayer on leathercare. My 944 had the leather sport seats, even at 20 years old they looked perfect. I believe due to ongoing maintainence of the leather. Of course I believe waxing preserves the paint too, everyone can do as they wish with their own toys...
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Old 12-20-2005, 03:16 PM   #18
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Not cynical at all, simply pointing out the obvious. If you go to any leather care products website, they will cite why their product is best. That is what they do, ie visit the AMSOIL website to see how great their oil is.

This leather product may be great but I am more convinced by your experience with it than the company's website assertions.

Having said that, I like the Lexol and Leatherique products based on my experience. This is not to say that they are the best (how would I know that?) just that they are not "junk" as it appears this company is implying.

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Old 12-20-2005, 03:28 PM   #19
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As you can see, Lexol is pretty high on themselves also!





LEXOL LEATHER CONDITIONER AND PRESERVATIVE


THE PRODUCT:



LEXOL is a liquid conditioner and preservative intended for use in the care and conservation of leather. Its purpose is to maintain the strength, beauty, utility and flexibility of leather - old and new - and to restore resiliency to old or neglected leather that has become hardened and stiff.



PRODUCT RATIONALE


In the manufacture of leather, as a final and essential step, the tanned hide is subjected to a process called ”fat-liquoring” in which it is treated with a generous supply of special oils - emulsions prepared from the appropriate lubricants - which lubricate the leather to confer the desired qualities of softness, flexibility and strength. Thus, when the leather leaves the tannery, it is at the correct pH and is fully lubricated due to the unique capability of these emulsions to be readily absorbed into, and combined with, the leather’s fibers. However, these oils must still be replenished periodically to maintain proper lubrication and to avert any tendency to deteriorate. The type of preparation that is most effective in achieving both these goals is an emulsion similar to those employed in the original manufacture of the leather. LEXOL is an emulsion of this type.



WHY LEXOL IS SUPERIOR TO OTHER LEATHER CONDITIONERS AND PRESERVATIVES



The oils in LEXOL have been modified to facilitate effective distribution of microscopically fine oil droplets which can be more readily absorbed into the leather fibers than the comparatively large droplets typical of raw oils or less fine emulsions. LEXOL’s smaller oil droplets combine with the fibers, because of their affinity or adherence that is lacking with other oils. Thus the modified oils in LEXOL are kept under control and are retained in the area of application. In this way, LEXOL is able to nourish the leather and its fibers while protecting against migration, or seepage, into adjacent materials or surfaces.



Many leather dressings utilize chemical solvents in order to facilitate penetration of oils into the leather. Such solvents can lead to ”bleeding” or migrating onto adjacent materials, causing discoloration or other damage. In addition, such chemical solvents may be flammable, irritating or toxic.



LEXOL does not contain any chemical solvents. As an aqueous emulsion, it achieves several objectives: (1) fiber penetration and nourishment; (2) absorption and retention in the leather; (3) control of migration or seepage. Unlike most organic solvents, LEXOL is nonflammable, odorless, non-toxic and non-sensitizing to the skin. Also, LEXOL does not impart a greasy or tacky feel to the surface of the leather.



Although LEXOL is widely accepted as a treatment for the more common vegetable and chrome-tanned leather, there are certain leathers for which it is not suitable (e.g., napped leathers, such as suede or glove soft leather, which call for treatment with lighter lubricants). NOTE: Leather that has become cracked from inadequate or inappropriate care cannot be restored to its original state by any available method.



In summary, LEXOL is readily absorbed into the fibers and provides lasting and effective lubrication without migration while leaving leather feeling soft and smooth.
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Old 12-22-2005, 05:33 PM   #20
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Talking

I still stand by my original post. The lacquer sealers and pigment dyes used in automotive and upholstery leather do not allow these products to even come in contact with the leather. I say this with nearly 30 years experience working with leather; I'm not just pulling this info out my @$$, nor am I relying on what others say.

Keeping leather cleaned and worked will help maintain it even if the conditioners can't do their job. You'll notice that the back seats (in cars that have them) are the ones that get stiffest the quickest, and the driver's seat stays the most supple.


If the product cannot be absorbed by the leather, it doesn't do one bloody bit of good. And while that layer of lacquer is intact, the products CANNOT penetrate to the leather. You have to remove the "protective" sealer from the leather before these products will penetrate. I have done this on several sets of auto upholstery, from a 1965 Chrysler Imperial (with original leather), to a 1989 Maserati, to a 1995 Lincoln, to a 1993 VW Corrado.. Once you remove the sealer, the leather will absorb any of these products like a sponge. None of the sitting and waiting 24 hours BS...I'm talking the conditioners soak in within 30 SECONDS and don't leave anything behind to wipe up.

Most of these leather products are fine, providing they can be absorbed by the leather itself. They restore the natural oils that have been removed during the tanning process, and through use and time. The only one that I personally feel is a collossal waste of money is the Maguire's. In my experience, it didn't do anything.

Honestly, Pure Neatsfoot Oil is one of the best things for leather. (Not Neatsfoot COMPOUND) Why? "Neat" is an olde English word for "cow", and neatsfoot oil is basically oil from rendering of cow hooves, horns, skin, cartilege, and other leftover cow parts. So, using neatsfoot oil is restoring the same oil that was in the leather when it was a living, breathing animal.

Over the years, I have used Lexol, Lederbalsam, Leatherique, Hammanol, Hydrophane, Maguires (yuck), Connolly Hide Food/Hide Care, Carr Day & Martin Leather Balsam, Flexalan, Leather Therapy, Leather CPR...the list really goes on and on for the products I have tried. As long as they don't contain silicone or petroleum distillates, they are fine for your leather. Any products with either of those components should be avoided.

Last edited by creseida; 12-22-2005 at 05:41 PM.
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