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Old 10-06-2018, 12:48 PM   #1
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Discussion question....lube on lugs

I have heard many different opinions on thus. I have heard a tiny bit of wax or lanolin, a single drop of oil. And I have heard bone dry always....just curious what guy's have heard or do ?

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Old 10-06-2018, 12:51 PM   #2
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I've always used a bit of anti-seize...
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Old 10-06-2018, 01:35 PM   #3
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From the owners manual...

(But to be honest, I never follow this instruction and always install bone dry ).

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Old 10-06-2018, 03:38 PM   #4
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I've always used a bit of anti seize. Particularly with alloy lug nuts...
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Old 10-06-2018, 07:48 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thstone View Post
From the owners manual...

(But to be honest, I never follow this instruction and always install bone dry ).

Anti seize on threads.......just feel like that is what will give proper torque values and fully develop fastener strength.

Tom what do you think that note means???
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Old 10-07-2018, 09:06 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geof3 View Post
I've always used a bit of anti seize. Particularly with alloy lug nuts...
Me too, just be sure to not over torque.
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Old 10-07-2018, 02:04 PM   #7
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If you over torque because you use grease or something like anti seize you can have a severe problem, because you wheels fly off.

https://youtu.be/G-6S8lVBYno

Regards, Markus
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Old 10-07-2018, 03:10 PM   #8
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In all my years of driving, and especially racing (which means taking wheels off and putting them back on hundreds of times), I’ve never used anything on the threads, other than making sure they were clean. The end result? I’ve never had any problems.
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Old 10-08-2018, 02:40 PM   #9
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I think the latest factory recommendation is not to apply anything. I used anti-seize for the last 30 years for all cars I maintained and no issues, but now I just use a wire brush to clean the thread. I do use anti-seize between alum wheel and steel rotor to prevent corrosion and sticking from experience.
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Old 10-08-2018, 03:11 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallblock454 View Post
If you over torque because you use grease or something like anti seize you can have a severe problem, because you wheels fly off.

https://youtu.be/G-6S8lVBYno

Regards, Markus
I do use a Torque wrench for tightening
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Old 10-08-2018, 10:16 PM   #11
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My Dad was an aerospace engineer and dry threads were verboten around our house. Every threaded fitting had a light lube or anti-seize to get the proper stretch at torque spec.
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Old 10-09-2018, 10:49 AM   #12
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Sewing machine oil or gun lube. Very light weight oil. But then I don't have to deal with rust.
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