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Old 03-20-2018, 11:59 AM   #1
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brake reservoir strainer removal

Okay, seriously, how the hell do you pull out the strainer in the brake fluid reservoir? 2002 Boxster S. I'm using a needle nose, spinning the thing round, trying to find some notches that line up. Nothing. Do I just get violent with it, let it pop out and splash brake fluid all over. Geez.

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Old 03-20-2018, 01:39 PM   #2
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I hate that damn thing. I carefully pried it out (its plastic and just bends). Maybe someone else knows the secret to removing it with grace.
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Old 03-20-2018, 02:09 PM   #3
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I hate that damn thing. I carefully pried it out (its plastic and just bends). Maybe someone else knows the secret to removing it with grace.
+ 1

I get it by inserting two fingers inside the screen (and fluid..) and spread them apart
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Old 03-20-2018, 06:43 PM   #4
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I gave up and just use my motive bleeder to push the extra fluid out of the reservoir. It's not that much more fluid to add and really doesn't take much more time.
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Old 03-21-2018, 05:38 AM   #5
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Brute force and ignorance with a pair of needle nose pliers


all seriousness aside, once you finally get it out, it is easier from then on to remove it
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Old 03-21-2018, 05:54 AM   #6
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I agree, total PITA. My first couple of flushes it was very easy to remove. The car was put away for about 8 years, and the next time I went at this I could not remove it either.
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Old 03-21-2018, 06:14 AM   #7
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I had difficulty with removing the strainer and to avoid any damage, I just flushed the whole system using the Motive Power Bleeder emptied the reservoir while replacing with new fluid
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Old 03-21-2018, 06:42 AM   #8
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I'd leave it alone altogether but I thought I should remove some fluid before I push in and replace the front pads. Plus I kinda wanted to know the current color so I could maybe buy a contrasting color. Then I'll know when I've pushed the old stuff out.

Sounds like I just have to be more aggressive with the damn thing.

Thanks for all the replies.
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Old 03-21-2018, 06:55 AM   #9
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I'd leave it alone altogether but I thought I should remove some fluid before I push in and replace the front pads. Plus I kinda wanted to know the current color so I could maybe buy a contrasting color. Then I'll know when I've pushed the old stuff out.

Sounds like I just have to be more aggressive with the damn thing.

Thanks for all the replies.
Then removing the strainer it totally unnecessary. There is absolutely no need to remove any fluid from the reservoir before changing the front pads. And if you are going to use something like the Motive pressure flushing system, again there is no need to remove the strainer; the Motive system uses positive displacement to push all of the old fluid out ahead of the new stuff. And even if you stay with the same color fluid, there is an obvious change in appearance when the clean shows up at the bleeder.
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Old 03-21-2018, 09:15 AM   #10
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Then removing the strainer it totally unnecessary. There is absolutely no need to remove any fluid from the reservoir before changing the front pads. And if you are going to use something like the Motive pressure flushing system, again there is no need to remove the strainer; the Motive system uses positive displacement to push all of the old fluid out ahead of the new stuff. And even if you stay with the same color fluid, there is an obvious change in appearance when the clean shows up at the bleeder.
x2 agree w/ all JFP states above when using Motive Bleeder 'wet'.

Some people, myself included, prefer using Motive Bleeders 'dry'. Instead of mixing new fluid w/ old in reservoir... or removing old fluid via top of reservoir, there is a super easy alternative (tangental to what OP desires... having less 'old' fluid pushed thru system when doing a flush). Treat as if you had overfilled... adjust level down the easiest way possible.

Simply connect your Motive Bleeder w/ old fluid still in... Pressurize and bleed off most of remaining at closest wheel/corner.* Same thing if you ended up w/ too much fluid after compressing all pistons w/ a pad change...(though would think if you're changing pads so worn you'd automatically insist on fluid flush). Anywho, doing so via bleeder virtually eliminates any risk of spilling fluid on your paint. Refill reservoir and proceed w/ regular flush protocol... pressurize and begin bleeding at corner furthest away. Check pressure and level after each corner to be extra safe and work sequentially on next closest corner until you finish at corner closest to reservoir.*

*SPECIAL NOTE - DO NOT EVER ALLOW RESERVOIR TO GO DRY. Doing so will introduce air into system. If you allow air in you will absolutely need the PIWIS system to activate ABS system while flushing to bleed air out.

Good luck
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Old 03-21-2018, 02:04 PM   #11
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Okay, I believe I will proceed with the screen in place. I'll bleed off the majority of the old fluid before compressing the caliper pistons. Thanks everyone for your input.
Now -- and I'm not joking -- should I go with ceramic or semi-metallic pads? It's street use only. And I'm looking at ATE or Sebro rotors. Opinions?

Let the debate begin. Seriously, though, I do value this group's opinions.
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Old 03-21-2018, 02:12 PM   #12
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I went with Hawk ceramic - for the low brake dust. Still a little bit of dust but nothing like I had before.
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Old 03-21-2018, 04:25 PM   #13
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I put on Akebono Euro ceramic pads.
Might as well say zero dusting now.
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Old 03-21-2018, 08:22 PM   #14
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You only need a PWIS or a durametric if you have PSM. The standard ANBS does not need the ABS pump activated

Also, you can only get amber colored brake fluid anymore. They outlawed the blue stuff years ago unfortunately. There may be some around, it will be pretty old by now.

I do my brake flush by volume and marked my catch bottle for each wheel position
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Old 03-25-2018, 05:58 AM   #15
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You only need a PWIS or a durametric if you have PSM.

Neither is needed w/ PSM and/or ABS so long as you do not let air into system (a la letting reservoir run dry).

Good luck
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