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Old 02-08-2016, 04:58 AM   #1
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Port on top of transmission...

First post here. Have a 2000 Boxster that I track. Last weekend, noticed some slippery stuff on the floor of the garage at the track. Like motor oil, but might be brake fluid (it was lighter in color; I use RBF 600). Anyway, went poking around and found possible source. There is a place on the right side of the tranny (if you are looking at the rear of the car), on the top - a small tube protruding from the top, at an angle, with a small black, plastic cap (see photo). The cap is loose fitting, but does not come off (I can spin it and lift it a bit, but it's not meant to come off without more force). The area around this port was wet. I did not check my clutch slave cylinder, but a guy had a transmission at the track and he showed me where that it. I may have to go back and look. Clutch performed well over the weekend, and I didn't notice any brake fluid loss in the master cylinder in the front of the car.

Does anyone know what this port is, and could it be, would it make sense, that this is a source for a leak? If not, then I've got to look at the slave cylinder.

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Old 02-08-2016, 05:42 AM   #2
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I believe that is a vent.
It prevents pressure from building up and blowing the seals out as the fluid warms up.
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Old 02-08-2016, 06:05 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emore93 View Post
I believe that is a vent.
It prevents pressure from building up and blowing the seals out as the fluid warms up.
^^Correct^^
To me that's a sign your trans is getting too hot. That's if it's coming out that vent. If you're tracking your car a lot, you might want to invest in a trans cooler. Trust me, you don't want to be looking for another 6 speed. The 2000+ 5 speeds are dime-a-dozen though.
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Old 02-08-2016, 07:36 AM   #4
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Alright...thanks for that quick response!! I figured it was some sort of "relief" port, but the tranny isn't under pressure. It would then overflow because of heat expansion. Fair enough. It is a stock 5-speed manual, original 2000 Boxster hardware.

So, here's my next question...if it is overflowing from heat, wouldn't it be gear oil? Gear oil is pretty viscous, no? What I saw on the floor, and dripping off the base of the tranny/engine connection was thin(ner), and light, amber colored. At first, I was worried that I had a RMS leak...but I am now convinced this came from above and ran down. Now regretting not taking a closer look at the fluid on the floor at the track garage.
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Old 02-08-2016, 08:33 AM   #5
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First you need to clean everything.It will take a loooong time. If it isn't clean ,how will you see where the leak begins ?
Is the vent partially blocked ? Is the oil level overfilled ?
When was the gbox oil last changed ? Oil change for the 6-speed is often neglected.
If you find an oil change is overdue, do it because this is a very expensive gearbox(6 speed). Use correct(obscure) oil(Search).
Whichever box it is, do the 'sticky finger' test in the drain hole to find the magnet & sludge/grease - if any. Sludge/grease=imminent bearing failure- so you have a bigger issue than a little leak . Lots more in Search. The 6-speed uses some sealed bearings like the infamous IMS. If you catch the issue early ......

Last edited by Gelbster; 02-08-2016 at 08:39 AM.
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Old 02-08-2016, 08:42 AM   #6
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Thanks for that. Cleaning it is a good idea. Need to also check the clutch slave. The stuff did look like brake fluid, and not a thick, viscous grease or oil. Do not know about the tranny oil change...can't say if it has ever been done. will need to check that. I did have it in recently to have the CV boot clamp replaced on that side, but that shoulnt have resulted in a tranny oil change. I saw where the loose clamp on the CV boot was throwing grease in the undercarriage, but the leaky stuff is not that.
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Old 02-08-2016, 08:48 AM   #7
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CV boot/clamp.
Sounds like sloppy work.
These cars are very unforgiving of sloppy work in my experience.
Suggest you check the other boots and clamps. Did they use the correct clamps ?Regular worm drive hose clamps -not good.
It is difficult to get any clamp to work on the CV housing if they did not scrupulously clean off all the grease. It will keep slipping off when the grease gets hot/the shaft travels full motion.
Sounds like you need to find a good Indie?
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Old 02-08-2016, 09:05 AM   #8
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By the leaky fluid description sounds like it may be power steering fluid? Different area than the tranny vent but it could have travelled over the engine? Steering fluid may have been hot and overflowed? My .02.
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Old 02-08-2016, 02:20 PM   #9
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Apologies for being all over the place on this...something else I noticed yesterday while under the car. On the side that seems to have the leak, my axle joint air guide is missing (I believe that's what it is - there is a companion piece on the other side that is still in place). I get that this has a cooling function, but is it critical? I'm just now realizing there may be a connection here, meaning this thing really does direct a lot of air flow up into this part of the drivetrain compartment.
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Old 02-08-2016, 04:04 PM   #10
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The Porsche fluid used in these gearboxes is pretty thin and watery (and clear-ish). It's not the 80 weight acrid smelling stuff you might be used to.

I've been told those scoops are important for air flow over the transmission. No idea if that's the case but this is the internet and the whole point is to parrot off what you read somewhere.
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