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Old 10-23-2015, 06:32 AM   #1
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What is the correct way to drive through a curve (spirited driving)?

When I come to an curvy exit ramp for example, do I accelerate going into it? Or midway into it? This is purely for fun to pull some Gs. Wondering what the correct way is.
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Old 10-23-2015, 06:39 AM   #2
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I like to roll onto the throttle from 3k rpm entering a sweeper and to have the revs at about 4.5k near the apex then full throttle from there on out
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Old 10-23-2015, 07:04 AM   #3
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Old 10-23-2015, 10:55 AM   #4
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Shiny side up.
But seriously, as long as you don't jump on the brakes during a high G corner, the car will probably have more grip than you have cojones.
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Old 10-23-2015, 11:05 AM   #5
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Flat out. That's the only way to drive. Flat out.
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Old 10-23-2015, 11:33 AM   #6
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Get your braking done before turn-in or trail brake if you know how. Heel and toe if you have to downshift. Corner entry should be at a constant speed and mid-range rpm's. Try not to brake in the middle of the corner as it will upset the balance of the car - better to enter the corner too slow rather than too fast. A late apex always helps corner exit speed. Maintain speed, turn in, let the car roll and feel the suspension set; then throttle steer through mid-corner. Get back on the throttle to accelerate out of the corner and start to unwind the steering wheel as early as possible as you begin corner exit. Don't forget to use the entire width of the lane/road to allow the car to track out (to the extent possible). All the while, be aware of sand, gravel, and other road debris that might affect grip and adjust your line and control inputs accordingly.

That's it. Easy breezy.

If you really want to learn drive well, go to a local trackday and have an instructor ride along with you. You will learn the proper techniques, go faster than you ever could on the street, and have more fun than you ever thought possible.
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Old 10-23-2015, 12:26 PM   #7
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Sign up for an autocross. It gives you the opportunity to test the limits of your Boxster in a safe environment. I have PSM (Porsche Stability Management) on my Boxster. I have run autocrosses with it on and off. I've learned a lot. I learned that even with the PSM on I was able to lose control of the car and spin it. In the owner's manual it states that PSM cannot overcome the law of Physics... they were right. It is great to have learning lessons in an Autocross environment than on an on ramp.

You also meet some great folks at the events.
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Old 10-23-2015, 02:01 PM   #8
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As fast as you can with a big grin on your face.
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Old 10-23-2015, 02:20 PM   #9
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Go to a PCA DE day(s)! This will answer all your questions. Highly recommended, safe and fun!
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Old 10-23-2015, 03:05 PM   #10
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Unless your talking about an exit ramp you are very familiar with, just be safe. If you're going into a corner you don't know, you can't know the apex, and without that info you won't know when to brake. Since you won't know when to brake, you won't know when to accelerate. As said, find a DE when you can. Working with an experienced instructor will increase your skills and confidence.
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Old 10-23-2015, 04:12 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thstone View Post
Get your braking done before turn-in or trail brake if you know how. Heel and toe if you have to downshift. Corner entry should be at a constant speed and mid-range rpm's. Try not to brake in the middle of the corner as it will upset the balance of the car - better to enter the corner too slow rather than too fast. A late apex always helps corner exit speed. Maintain speed, turn in, let the car roll and feel the suspension set; then throttle steer through mid-corner. Get back on the throttle to accelerate out of the corner and start to unwind the steering wheel as early as possible as you begin corner exit. Don't forget to use the entire width of the lane/road to allow the car to track out (to the extent possible). All the while, be aware of sand, gravel, and other road debris that might affect grip and adjust your line and control inputs accordingly.

That's it. Easy breezy.

If you really want to learn drive well, go to a local trackday and have an instructor ride along with you. You will learn the proper techniques, go faster than you ever could on the street, and have more fun than you ever thought possible.
^^^ this ^^^
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Old 10-23-2015, 04:35 PM   #12
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Watch this video over and over until you get it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aDkdg4VMdyE
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Old 10-23-2015, 08:16 PM   #13
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Watch this video over and over until you get it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aDkdg4VMdyE
Harry Hogge: What do you know about stock car racing?
Cole Trickle: Well... watched it on television, of course.
Harry Hogge: You've seen it on television?
Cole Trickle: ESPN. The coverage is excellent, you'd be surprised at how much you can pick up.
Harry Hogge: I'm sure I would.
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Old 10-23-2015, 09:38 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by thstone View Post
Get your braking done before turn-in or trail brake if you know how. Heel and toe if you have to downshift. Corner entry should be at a constant speed and mid-range rpm's. Try not to brake in the middle of the corner as it will upset the balance of the car - better to enter the corner too slow rather than too fast. A late apex always helps corner exit speed. Maintain speed, turn in, let the car roll and feel the suspension set; then throttle steer through mid-corner. Get back on the throttle to accelerate out of the corner and start to unwind the steering wheel as early as possible as you begin corner exit. Don't forget to use the entire width of the lane/road to allow the car to track out (to the extent possible). All the while, be aware of sand, gravel, and other road debris that might affect grip and adjust your line and control inputs accordingly.

That's it. Easy breezy.

If you really want to learn drive well, go to a local trackday and have an instructor ride along with you. You will learn the proper techniques, go faster than you ever could on the street, and have more fun than you ever thought possible.

I did a club/dealer-sponsored DE this spring with Porsche instructors (Kees Nierop and Jonathon Urlin) and this is exactly how they taught me to do it. Brake hard before the turn and go in slow, keep about 10% on the throttle through the middle part, and then ease on to full throttle (don't stomp it) on the way out. It took me about half the day to realize that I was trying to maintain too much speed going into the turn and I improved dramatically after that. The part that really stuck with me was how you use the front wheels to steer into the turn and the rear wheels to rotate the car out of it. It feels amazing when it works - major grin factor!
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Old 10-24-2015, 07:54 AM   #15
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Slow in Fast out
As most say, hard on the brakes just before curve, Shift somewhere at that point. Even throttle through the turn until at some point you get on the throttle to come out. A lot depends on the radius and grading of the road. You may even feel when the car is ready for acceleration out. That acceleration is what changes the balance of the car and makes curves so much fun
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Old 10-24-2015, 08:53 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thstone View Post
Harry Hogge: What do you know about stock car racing?
Cole Trickle: Well... watched it on television, of course.
Harry Hogge: You've seen it on television?
Cole Trickle: ESPN. The coverage is excellent, you'd be surprised at how much you can pick up.
Harry Hogge: I'm sure I would.
Buy Need for Speed and practice, practice, practice:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oeW_drTwlNI
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Old 10-24-2015, 05:36 PM   #17
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Be smooth! Smooth on the brakes (squeeze them), smooth steering inputs, smooth on the throttle (again, squeeze it). Abrupt inputs to any control can upset the attitude of the car and complicate things when you are really going quickly.

Smooth, smooth, smooth!
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Old 10-24-2015, 05:42 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by Racer Boy View Post
Be smooth! Smooth on the brakes (squeeze them), smooth steering inputs, smooth on the throttle (again, squeeze it). Abrupt inputs to any control can upset the attitude of the car and complicate things when you are really going quickly.

Smooth, smooth, smooth!
This applies to other things too........
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Old 10-24-2015, 06:59 PM   #19
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Exit ramp?

Don't take those fast until you've had one on one instruction with your local PCA autocross instructor.
After which you still won't take thise fast. I can count at least one forum member who tore the wheels right of the car after hitting the curbing at speed...if memory serves the damage otherwise didn't look that bad but was bad enough for the insurance company to call it game over.
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Old 10-25-2015, 08:38 AM   #20
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Shiny side up.
But seriously, as long as you don't jump on the brakes during a high G corner, the car will probably have more grip than you have cojones.
LOL, this is Exactly what I have found !!!!! The car has more grip than I have Balls..
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