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Old 12-26-2012, 01:32 PM   #1
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If you need to change fuel filter, use a lift.

I just changed the fuel filter. I followed Pelicanparts directions.

I did it using jack stands. I barely finished the job. If possible, avoid doing this job using jack stands because you will barely have enough space. You really need a lift.

My hands were dead tired by the time I finished this job and I cannot get the smell of gasoline out of them. I wore gloves. It took me 1 hour to finish the job. I imagine I can get it done in 15 minutes or less with a lift.

Here are directions for the job.
1. Remove plastic underbody trim in center of car using 10mm socket. There are at least 8 bolts.
2. Remove foam spacer.
3. Remove 10mm bolts from bracket
4. Loosen flat head screw to loosen fuel filter
5. Remove ground and fuel lines from filter. Have a bucket underneath car to catch the fuel.
6. Install in reverse order.

Seemed easy enough.
Step 1-3 was easy
Step 4 was difficult as the screw is in an awkward place and the flat head screw driver tip needs to be VERY thin to fit in the screw.
Step 5 was very difficult. The fuel lines did not want to come out. You have to push the side button on the connectors to release the fuel lines but it is Not easy. Re-installing them was also difficult as there is no room for your hands to reach the connectors or electrical ground or fuel filter. You need small hands for the job.

So again, do not do this job unless you have a lift. Using a lift will make it much easier.

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Old 12-26-2012, 01:47 PM   #2
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Did you release the fuel pressure? Otherwise, fuel will come spraying out due to the high pressure of the system. I didn't change my Box S due to low mileage, but it still is very difficult to get under the car and agree a lift would be a better choice. Probably in the difficulty range of bleeding the clutch!
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Old 12-26-2012, 01:49 PM   #3
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I did this job utilizing a lift for a third time (3 different Boxsters) just a few weeks ago. Although the first two times were uneventful, I managed to break the fuel line fitting for the line that runs from the back of the filter to the fuel rail.
I was struggling to release the fuel line at the filter ( forward line was easily removed) and was trying to lower the filter out of the tunnel area to get a better grip on the fuel line fitting release buttons. Next thing I new, snap! Boy was I pissed at myself.

A new fuel line runs $92 + tax and shipping from Sunc__st.

So much saving by DYI this time...
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Old 12-26-2012, 01:50 PM   #4
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jmatta,
I am so lucky to have access to a lift...I can due the clutch slave bleed pretty easy on the lift. Don't know if I could do it at all on ramps.
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Old 12-26-2012, 02:59 PM   #5
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I have done this task twice using jack stands. The OP is correct, its a PITA.
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Old 12-26-2012, 03:03 PM   #6
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Yep I did the fuel filter on jack stand too not long ago. Wasnt that bad, but I agree, if you have access to a lift, do it on it.

Now if I can find a way to unbolt the damn coil bolt that is stripped. :-/

Later all
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Old 12-27-2012, 11:18 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmatta View Post
Did you release the fuel pressure? Otherwise, fuel will come spraying out due to the high pressure of the system. I didn't change my Box S due to low mileage, but it still is very difficult to get under the car and agree a lift would be a better choice. Probably in the difficulty range of bleeding the clutch!
Only a few drops came out. (less than 1/4 cup). Most of the fuel came out of the fuel filter itself, which again wasn't much. (1 cup).

Day 1:
Washed my hands with dish detergent, clothing detegent, hand soap, shampoo, and alcohol. Gasoline smell did not go away from my hands. Washed my clothes twice but they smell like gas just because I was under the car for a while with the strong smell of gaslone rubbing off on my clothes.

Day 2 (today):
Washed my hands again with hand soap, shampoo, and orange mechanics soap. My hands still smell like gas. I only got maybe 3 drops of gas on my hands when I did the job.
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Last edited by ProjectM96; 12-27-2012 at 11:22 AM.
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Old 12-27-2012, 11:23 AM   #8
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Just buy a 987 series Boxster. No fuel filter.
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Old 12-27-2012, 11:59 AM   #9
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undoing the bracket that holds the adjacent cooling lines and moving them out of the way makes access a lot easier. also allows removal of the filter with less spillage.
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Old 12-27-2012, 01:48 PM   #10
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People, don’t make this more complicated than it really is.

You need to relieve the fuel pressure; this can be done by attaching a gauge with a pressure relief setup to the test port, it can also be accomplished by pulling the fuel pump fuse or relay while the car is idling. As others have noted, get everything you don’t need out of the way, undoing the bracket with the other lines and pulling them (gently) to one side with a bungee cord does wonders in this department. You need a container with a lot of surface area to catch any drips; a bucket is the wrong choice. A large, flat pan or tray, like a darkroom developer tray, is perfect. In the shop, we use a fluid catch system that is over 36 inches across, lots of surface to catch any drips or spurts, easy to dump and clean when you are done.

Wear shop gloves; we prefer nitrile over latex due to allergy’s and the fact the nitrile gloves are more chemical resistant, and are available with a textured surface for grip. Put on the gloves when you are ready to pull the filter, take them off and toss them when you are finished; absolutely no gas smell on your otherwise clean hands.

While changing the fuel filter is easier on a lift, as is just about anything else, it can still be done on the ground if you approach it in the correct manner.
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Last edited by JFP in PA; 12-27-2012 at 06:46 PM.
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Old 12-27-2012, 05:10 PM   #11
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I agree with JFP, this is not that tough. I wasn't looking forward to it but it was easier than I thought it would be. Unscrew the fuel cap, get a pan to catch fuel spillage. I was surprised how much crap drained out of the old filter, it was black!!!
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Old 12-28-2012, 12:29 PM   #12
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Can the fuel filter be accessible when it is on a mid-rise scissor lift or is this a 2 or 4-post lift type job?
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Old 12-28-2012, 12:42 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stateofidleness View Post
Can the fuel filter be accessible when it is on a mid-rise scissor lift or is this a 2 or 4-post lift type job?
i did it on a scissor lift.
wasn't that bad as many describe here.
on the other hand, prior to doing the fuel filter i replaced the front engine mount and oil cooler O-ring, so i drained the coolant, and removed the water hoses from the block and water pump. that allowed me to drop the coolant lines that goes to the front of the car, and i gained pretty good access.
i disconnected the bracket that holds the filter from the chassis, and slide it to the back of the car as one unit.
one thing i do recommend, remove both under body plastic covers, before yo put the car on the lift.
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Old 12-28-2012, 12:44 PM   #14
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It can be done on just about any type of lift that does not have structure in the way, I know for a fact it can be done on the BendPak mid rise lift.

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