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Old 11-24-2011, 06:15 AM   #1
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First Spark Plug Replacement

Getting ready to do my first spark plug replacement. I have read the numerous posts on here and they have been very helpful. Still have a couple of questions though.

1. In replacing the tubes/o-rings several posts have referred to a "Marine Plug Puller" for getting the old ones out. I have searched the internet high and low and cannot find such an animal. Is it called something else? Would Harbor Freight or Craftsman carry this tool?

2. Do you really need the $45 tube of grease? Could I use good old white lithium grease? Do I even need grease?

Thanks for your time and help.

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Old 11-24-2011, 06:36 AM   #2
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Just about any boat or outdoor sports place should sell 1" transom plugs, which is another name for what you are looking for. I found it didn't work that well for me as I had trouble getting it tight enough to grip. Instead, I used the 1" mandrel from my drum sander set and that worked perfectly.

It's not grease you want - it is anti-seize paste. You just put a very small amount on the threads of your spark plugs. A good idea whenever you are connecting dissimilar metals. You might hear a lot of hooey about the paste affecting the accuracy of your torque wrench but as far as I'm concerned that's exactly what it is - a load of hooey.
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Old 11-24-2011, 08:23 AM   #3
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just go to you local auto parts store and ask for a boat drain plug.

And yes it is worth the cost to get new tubes.






I got the one with the t handle but I think the first one would work better.


less than $5
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Old 11-24-2011, 08:41 AM   #4
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DO NOT put anti-seize on your thread of the plugs. There is a TSB about this. I will try to find it and post it here.

I had no problems using the transom plug on all six.....you just have to crank it very tightly.
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Old 11-24-2011, 08:43 AM   #5
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Porsche, published a bulletin indicating that it doesn't recommend using anti-seize compound on spark plugs for any of their engines (Porsche Technical Bulletin 9102, Group 2 identifier 2870). The bulletin applies retroactively to all models and the theory is that the anti-seize tends to act as an electrical insulator between the plug and the cylinder head. This could have detrimental effect on the firing of the spark due to the loss of a good, consistent ground connection.
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Old 11-24-2011, 09:11 AM   #6
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I use a copper based anti seize, regardless.

On a recent acquisition I got a Boxster with 4 loose spark plugs, one blown out, and one that came out with all of it's threads in the head. A little anti seize (just a dot) will go a long way.
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Old 11-24-2011, 09:25 AM   #7
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I used the boat plug wiht the "T" handle and it worked great. I did not use any grease on the plug threads.
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Old 11-24-2011, 09:55 AM   #8
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The transom plug works great,just cut off the thicker rubber part at the top of the plug. As far as lubricating the threads of the spark plugs, don't over think this guys. Just use a little bit of oil on the threads, the next time the plug will come right out.
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Old 11-24-2011, 10:05 AM   #9
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Thanks for all the advise. As for the grease I get the impression from reading the Pelican parts list that it is for the tubes not the plug threads because on the description of each tube it says to purchase the grease for installation.
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Old 11-24-2011, 10:35 AM   #10
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A little white lith or even just some oil will work fine on the tube o-rings. It will help to make sure they don't bind and roll out of their grooves during installation.

I stand by what I said about the anti-seize paste. I used it (emphasize sparingly) and I have had no grounding issues at all. When you weight the possibility of having a plug seized in the block against this supposed grounding issue, then, to me, it's kind of a no-brainer. However, to be fair, let's put the question out there... how many people have experienced grounding problems after using anti-seize paste on their plug threads? And how many have had extraction issues from not using the paste?
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Old 11-24-2011, 10:49 AM   #11
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More importantly, Why would you not take the advice of the people who designed and built the engine? Why would you ignore a TSB?
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Old 11-24-2011, 12:14 PM   #12
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Excellent point - why would I not take the advice of the people who designed and built the IMS bearing?
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Old 11-24-2011, 01:02 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John99Boxster View Post
Porsche, published a bulletin indicating that it doesn't recommend using anti-seize compound on spark plugs for any of their engines (Porsche Technical Bulletin 9102, Group 2 identifier 2870). The bulletin applies retroactively to all models and the theory is that the anti-seize tends to act as an electrical insulator between the plug and the cylinder head. This could have detrimental effect on the firing of the spark due to the loss of a good, consistent ground connection.
It also represents one of the worst technical pronouncements they have ever made. The first time you encounter a seized plug, and end up having to re-tap the opening; or worse yet, install a threaded insert after the original threads are destroyed by removing the old plugs, you will understand why anti seize is critical on dissimilar metals exposed to high temperatures.

We have used anti seize on Porsche street and race engines for several decades, and never once had any plug firing issues...............
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Old 11-24-2011, 01:05 PM   #14
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More importantly, Why would you not take the advice of the people who designed and built the engine? Why would you ignore a TSB?
Because it is wrong.................Just as they were when they told dealers and customers that it was not possible to change an IMS bearing without splitting the cases…………
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Old 11-24-2011, 02:14 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by JFP in PA View Post
Because it is wrong.................Just as they were when they told dealers and customers that it was not possible to change an IMS bearing without splitting the cases…………
Its not wrong, they're just trying to prevent the average, retarded person that thinks they know exactly how to fix their car from destroying it....

If you use too much the plug CAN, but probably won't, blow out of the threads. If you use a copper based Anti-Sieze compound, it will still conduct electricity and therefore make a strong enough ground. Just don't use to much...

But we're just scaring the guy... Changing your Spark Plugs is not the technical of a job and I'm sure they'll be fine no matter what you do. Don't stress out about it :P
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Old 11-24-2011, 02:40 PM   #16
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If anti seize was going to cause your plugs to come loose, it ought to make your lug nuts and wheels fall off as well, which it simply does not do. I have never seen a plug using anti seize, that was torqued correctly, come loose; regardless of how much anti seize was used. And both copper and aluminum based anti seize work equally as well..................
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Old 11-24-2011, 04:26 PM   #17
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I'm sorry if anyone thinks my loose spark plugs were due to over use of anti-seize, I meant otherwise. there was no sign of anti-seize and one of the spark plugs pulled out all the threads from the head on removal. I've been wrenching at the dealership level for 15 years and never had a issue with using anti-seize. But I have ran across heads without anti-seize with issues upon removal.
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Old 11-24-2011, 06:40 PM   #18
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Milk of magnesia

I have heard of milk of magnesia being used as anti-sieze ......not sure about its electrical conductivity
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Old 11-24-2011, 08:08 PM   #19
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A little dab of anti seize is a good thing on those spark plugs despite what Porsche says. A little dab mind you. How can you have blind faith in Porsche ? They do tell us some bad advice. How many owners wait to change the oil at 15,000 miles ?

As far as the spark plug tubes go. If they are not leaking, leave them alone. They are not that hard to get to if/when they start to leak.
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Old 11-25-2011, 12:53 AM   #20
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i've used copper anti-seize on every spark plug for the last 30 years. 5 years of that as a dealer tech and 15 as an aircraft tech (not just spark plugs). i've never had a problem (electrical or mechanical) with a lubed plug. they only problems i've seen are from dry plugs. rusted in, pulled threads, you name it.

copper on spark plugs and lug bolts, nickel on O2 sensors. and a little lithium on those o-rings...

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