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Old 08-29-2009, 12:36 AM   #1
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I feel stupid for asking buttt...... :D

As of now, Im pretty sure the bottom of my coolant tank is cracked. Before I do the repair/replace... is there a way I can circumvent spending around $300 or so on a new tank and repair the bottom of my old one successfully when I take it off the box?

I figured since it is a pretty common problem/repair someone would have come up with an easy and light on the wallet solution.

Cheers,

Adam

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Old 08-29-2009, 03:13 AM   #2
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Adam, how about $192.19:

http://e-partssales.com/miva/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=P&Product_Code=99610614708&Category_Code=986Cooling
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Old 08-29-2009, 09:36 PM   #3
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That tune sounds better, but still.. hasnt anyone come up with a way of repairing it /sealing it with something or things??
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Old 08-30-2009, 11:04 AM   #4
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I have a little background in engineering and have some more in materials.

Basically those tanks are most likely polythene, poly propylene or nylon. That makes the type of repair real limited. Nothing including any sort glue will stick to to these materialsd with any permanence at all.

The only thing you can do is weld them. It takes some trial and error and some fineness, but the alternative, depending on your pay scale, might make it worth a try. Ya also need to be pretty handy. NO GUARENTEES here, depends on your acumen.



1) You need to do some research and find out which "poly..." is normally used . Unless Porsche use nylon (see above), go on ebay and look new aftermarket tanks for any car model and see what "high quality poly____" they make them out of.

For nylon, look at it really really close at the plack part and see if there are any sighs of very small fibers coming to the surface, iIf there are, guess what. Either way the techniques is the same (Different "welding" rod though).

2) Don't know if this is the case here but most plastics have a distinctive smell when melted, one of the polys smells like wax...don't no if the others do to.or are to subtle to tell.

2) For a poly, if you a have sheet/plastic rod shop nearby, go buy a scrap or 2 of that poly___ 1/16-1/8 sheet or rod. For sheet, cut it into strips about 1/8th wide with shears. Otherwise, just go pick up the cheapest, new, overflow tank you can and cut it up into strips (kia(?))

3) Get a big asx soldering iron. Start melting the plastic on your tank (both nylon and poly.). At one end of the crack. Melt deepest into the crack but don't' go all the way through. also keep the surface surrounding the crack hot and melty (about 1/4" wide on either side of crack).

Start feeding your poly rod in and work it around with soldiering iron . You want the old and new material to be really mixed together. Used the iron to stir it together. Then just work your way along the crack. You want the best weld on the ends of the crack...a good deep blob.

Nylon: Same deal as above but jut get thick weed wacker string instead of above poly-whatever. (They may even bond to each other, don't know). Because of the fibers it' a bit more messy.


6 years ago I snapped the to nipples off one of the front plastic radiators. No-one could replace the just fiber reinforced nylon end cap and no glue or solvent can stick to it and hold. On a tip I welded them back as described above with weed-wacker string (so happens to be fiber reinforced to). Still holding today, through a number of over heats (high, high pressure), has outlasted my trans. and steering wheel, etc.,

So really, not complicated. just get some matching plastic, a big soldering iron and give it a try. Figure a way to pressure test it before you put it in.

Regards, PK
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Old 09-01-2009, 07:07 PM   #5
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I'm guessing after you finally get it out, you'll be willing to spend $200 for a new one in hopes of avoiding doing it again.
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Old 09-01-2009, 11:44 PM   #6
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Paul,

It's all a case of where you are in life, who you are, and your skill set potential. When I was younger and my time was not very valuable, I stlll owned, built and rebuilt quite an impressive stable with what I could afford, sweat, an open mind and perseverence. Not just a great feeling of accomplished or getting to drive my dream cars, but what an education in materials, mechanics, fabrication, processes, etc, etc.

How much would that education cost, for me nothing, I made money. And what I learned I use to this day in my profession. product design.

Regards, PK
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Old 09-02-2009, 04:03 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PlayersExpress
That tune sounds better, but still.. hasnt anyone come up with a way of repairing it /sealing it with something or things??
For my $0.02 worth.... you will never be able to repair the tank. You may be able to "weld" it back up and it would hold water. But the weld would never hold the pressure once the tank and engine are up to temperature. The radiator bottle is actually part of the cooling system in these cars.

Once again... worth $0.02
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Old 09-02-2009, 09:49 AM   #8
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You may be very right, he may not be able to do it. It looked to me like he was looking for what other possible alternatives there might to plunking down a few bills for a poorly designed, glorified $19 windshield wiper tank.

Anyway, though he may not be able to, pretty sure I could Looks easier and easier the more I think about it. (You wouldn't believe what I've pulled off over the years with thest things). This thing is nothing. (naysayers inspire me more than anything, almost a guarantees of success)...wanna bet???

PlayersExpress, I f you're still tuned in and still looking for an option, heres is a revision I don't think can fail. I'll be really brief now. All the details of it if we here from you. It will cost about $50 in materials.

You would weld as described before, *check for leaks (very closely), scruff up the whole bottom section by hand with with 40 grit *heavy duty sand *paper. Then wipe it down with a good degreser *solvent

Then, you just to wrap up the bottom half like a turban with strips of *fiberglass and *marine/aerospace epoxy. When it all cures, the weld is going to serve as the seal, the fiberglass turban will be the added super strength against the hydrostatic pressure inside.

...that will work.

It's going to be pretty butt-ugly. But, it also will be hidden, stronger than ever, and water tight . It should also help prevent future cracks.

*Details, needs elaboration

Regards, PK
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Old 09-02-2009, 03:54 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pk2
Paul,

It's all a case of where you are in life, who you are, and your skill set potential. When I was younger and my time was not very valuable, I stlll owned, built and rebuilt quite an impressive stable with what I could afford, sweat, an open mind and perseverence. Not just a great feeling of accomplished or getting to drive my dream cars, but what an education in materials, mechanics, fabrication, processes, etc, etc.

How much would that education cost, for me nothing, I made money. And what I learned I use to this day in my profession. product design.

Regards, PK
We sound alike in many ways, but my comment was actually a response to PlayersExpress.
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Old 09-03-2009, 12:11 AM   #10
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I understand the comment Paul, but in essence Pk2 is right. Where I am in life... lets see Im a full time college student who also worked a full time job to support myself, well.. I did work until the 1st of July when I got laid off. Its been 2 months and havent been able to find a job. So currently, Im on a small fixed income with expenses and can not afford to not have a car.. yet I would barely be able to afford the "correct fix."

Now do you see the catch 22 im in? I need my car to get to school, but I cant really afford an expensive repair as of "right now." If I still had my job or gain a new position, I wouldnt hesitate to replace it with a new one and be done with it.

Let me look into your ideas Pk2, it sounds like it could work.


Adam

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