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Old 01-16-2016, 11:57 AM   #1
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A cautionary Tale about a 986

Hi Guys

Thought I would tell you all about an recent incident while attempting to sort out an oil leak from bank 1 timing chain tensioner on my 1999 2.5 986...

I identified my oil leak to be coming from the aluminium washer fitted to the timing chain tensioner on bank 1....After some research I found that the close contact of the steel tensioner and aluminium washer caused a chemical reaction and leads to a break down of the seal thus causing oil to leak... Apparently this is a common issue and well documented...

So after some helpful advice from some of yourselves and armed with my 986 pdf manual I started work...

I was called away almost immediately so after removing the access panel from inside cab I asked my son to pull off the three green caps from the back of the cam shafts so that I could set up the timing with a view to locking engine at TDC and also locking cam shafts on bank 1

When I got back... Disaster... the green cap on bank two had been inadvertently pushed inwards and had dropped down beneath its port hole... Once I had regained consciousness I used a borescope to have a look. I could see it but when I tried to remove it the dam thing dropped down and ended up beneath the timing chain...

So I pulled off the oil pump on bank 2 cant see or get to it finally bit the bullet and pulled off cam cover on bank 2, not an easy job and after it was all off I used the camera and magnet to recover itn

Its not just a case of putting the cover straight back on, it has to be cleaned and prepared same with the sump plus all the extra bloody green caps... £6 each they are lol...

Built it all up today, even managed to actually do the oil leak from tensioner...

So be careful out there.....

regards
james
glasgow

Last edited by banzia; 01-16-2016 at 12:01 PM.
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Old 01-16-2016, 12:27 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by banzia View Post
Hi Guys

Thought I would tell you all about an recent incident while attempting to sort out an oil leak from bank 1 timing chain tensioner on my 1999 2.5 986...

I identified my oil leak to be coming from the aluminium washer fitted to the timing chain tensioner on bank 1....After some research I found that the close contact of the steel tensioner and aluminium washer caused a chemical reaction and leads to a break down of the seal thus causing oil to leak... Apparently this is a common issue and well documented...

So after some helpful advice from some of yourselves and armed with my 986 pdf manual I started work...

I was called away almost immediately so after removing the access panel from inside cab I asked my son to pull off the three green caps from the back of the cam shafts so that I could set up the timing with a view to locking engine at TDC and also locking cam shafts on bank 1

When I got back... Disaster... the green cap on bank two had been inadvertently pushed inwards and had dropped down beneath its port hole... Once I had regained consciousness I used a borescope to have a look. I could see it but when I tried to remove it the dam thing dropped down and ended up beneath the timing chain...

So I pulled off the oil pump on bank 2 cant see or get to it finally bit the bullet and pulled off cam cover on bank 2, not an easy job and after it was all off I used the camera and magnet to recover itn

Its not just a case of putting the cover straight back on, it has to be cleaned and prepared same with the sump plus all the extra bloody green caps... £6 each they are lol...

Built it all up today, even managed to actually do the oil leak from tensioner...

So be careful out there.....

regards
james
glasgow
To prevent this from happening, drill a small hole in the green cap, then thread a sheet metal screw into the hole, and them pull on the screw to remove the cap.
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Old 01-18-2016, 04:17 AM   #3
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To prevent this from happening, drill a small hole in the green cap, then thread a sheet metal screw into the hole, and them pull on the screw to remove the cap.
NOW you tell us......
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Old 01-18-2016, 07:37 AM   #4
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I use a small pick tool with a 90 degree bend at the end to puncture the middle of the plug, then pull it out.
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Old 01-18-2016, 07:59 AM   #5
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NOW you tell us......
I believe that suggestion is included in the retrofit instructions.
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