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Old 06-11-2020, 07:05 AM   #1
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Removing ignition assembly and/or steering wheel lock without key

So yesterday I posted about rescuing my Boxster with no remaining keys, thought I had beat the system when I figured out a plan to cut my key out of the loop when starting the car...

But when I went to look up how to remove the ignition lock, the first step was put in your key and turn it

Ideally what I want to do is remove this thing:



from my car without a key, is that possible?

If that's not possible, can I at least disable the steering wheel lock and wire up my switch elsewhere?

(Or do I even have to remove the steering wheel lock? I was wondering, does it automatically unlock if the car is running? Or does the key physically remove the lock)


Last edited by selaliadobor; 06-12-2020 at 06:16 PM.
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Old 06-11-2020, 07:27 AM   #2
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The key releases the lock, and what you are proposing is an invitation for someone to steal you car.
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Old 06-11-2020, 07:48 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by JFP in PA View Post
The key releases the lock, and what you are proposing is an invitation for someone to steal you car.
Thanks for confirmation on the key, but sure why you're jumping to the conclusion I didn't put any thought into theft.

I'm still going to have an immobilizer that requires the presence of a programmed key fob to start, it just won't be the Porsche immobilizer and key fob that are used.

There's that ECU Repair shop that will delete your immobilizer if you send it in to them right? So any sufficiently motivated thief with physical access can steal the car anyways.

Of course there's also the final line of defense: there's much more attractive targets than a 20 year old Boxster
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Old 06-11-2020, 10:39 AM   #4
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There's that ECU Repair shop that will delete your immobilizer if you send it in to them right? So any sufficiently motivated thief with physical access can steal the car anyways.
Not in my world, that would require a full understanding of Porsche programming logic for the DME, which VERY FEW have ever gotten near, much less deleted the security system for one of these cars.
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Old 06-11-2020, 12:33 PM   #5
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If it's your car and worth little in it's current condition, I can understand 'hacking' the system to make it work. Not to endorse your plan, but to get that part out this may be helpful.
Replacing the steering lock and ignition tumbler: The Houston 04 SE
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Old 06-11-2020, 03:29 PM   #6
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There are a lot of cars out today with way more advanced encryption schemes on their immobilizers that get stolen because there's enough demand for them. Some unethical hacker breaks the system and then sells a buttoned up version to thieves.

Unfortunately, the same way the ethical people at the ECU Repair place found a bypass and used it to help out Spec Boxster racers, if 986s were as common as Civics, I'm sure someone would have replicated the work for the bad guys

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However, these aren't common enough, and aren't worth that much, so I doubt a sufficiently motivated thief exists

If anything I'd more worried about someone stealing the keys, or taking it while it's running. We've reached the point if "herd immunity" for hot-wiring, most modern cars can't be hot-wired without model specific tools, so if they're trying to steal you car they'll skip straight to trying to get a key or just hauling it away if it's worth enough

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Now more on topic I saw your post 78F350 and it helped me understand this better. From what I've found, there's two options, mess up the ignition cylinder, or mess up the pin. I'm debating which is the lesser of two evils, but right now I'm thinking the cylinder since I'd rather make sure I can get the entire assembly out before tearing apart my dash than find out after that I can't break the pin out...
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Old 06-13-2020, 06:53 PM   #7
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So tried to get the lock out today and my take away is... I need a locksmith

I came so close to getting it too

First attempt was to drill out the lock, and somehow the drill managed to turn the key into the ACC position!

I would have been golden if I had just been rational here... but in my excitement I tried to insert the key and turn it, which turned out to be a big mistake

It ended up in some sort of no-man's-land between ACC and Start. Couldn't get it to budge anymore, and actually broke a drill bit inside.

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From there I got to disassembling the gauge cluster and trying to remove the whole assembly.

The weird thing is the pin holding the assembly in place seemed to be pushed down when I put pressure, but the assembly refused to budge despite removing all the bolts and screws.

The steering wheel also didn't seem to be locked at any point in all this, so I'm wondering if the last owner "deleted" the steering wheel lock (which I was planning on doing anyways)

Anyways, that's where I gave up.

One major problem is I'm in an expensive area of NYC and locksmiths hear "Porsche" and think I'm about to make a boat payment for them. One refused to remove the cylinder unless I would let them install a new assembly that they would source and paid for the whole installation, which wasn't happening.

I might just get it towed to a dealer and pay for them to right this whole mess, like I honestly should have in the first place.

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