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Old 12-23-2006, 02:23 AM   #1
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What's My 0-60 Time??

I've got a stock 2002 Boxster (217 HP).
I'm a damn good driver
I've read a host of 0-60 times documeneted on this car:
Porsche Manual says 6.6 seconds (worst)
Car and Driver, EVO, and other mags go from 6.2 sec. to 6.6
Any opinions out there as to what the real number is?
I've done some subjective tests based on runs I've made, comparing to my other car, a Merc C32 AMG, which gets about 5.2 sec. 0-60 time
I'm thinking 6.3 sec. is about right.
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Old 12-23-2006, 03:17 AM   #2
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What tranny do you have...Tip or manual?
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Old 12-23-2006, 05:09 AM   #3
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Thumbs up

5 speed manual tranny
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Old 12-23-2006, 05:41 AM   #4
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OK, then...6.55 at best.
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Old 12-23-2006, 06:31 AM   #5
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Why do magazines report faster times?
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Old 12-23-2006, 06:32 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YellowPorscheMan2002
Why do magazines report faster times?

Well, there is that advertising thing!
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Old 12-23-2006, 06:58 AM   #7
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There's also the fact that magazines sometimes get "specially prepared" cars, and since they don't own them, are much more likely to abuse the car to get that extra tenth or two.
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Old 12-23-2006, 07:09 AM   #8
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This is Automobile magazine's approach, which you may find interesting reading:

Road Test Data - Automobile Magazine

TESTING PROCEDURES AND PHILOSOPHY

Equipment: VBOX II GPS-based system manufactured by Racelogic, Buckingham, England. (You can verify our results by buying your own at www.racelogic.co.uk for $11,800.) A Doppler shift applied to radio signals received from the US Department of Defense Global Positioning System satellites yields velocity, position, and other information which is recorded for analysis.

Vehicle state: Driver (no passengers), full fuel tank, break-in mileage.

Driver: In the interests of consistency and comparability, all formal testing is conducted by Don Sherman, Automobile Magazine's technical editor. He's been doing this for 34 years.

Acceleration test: Standing start with aggressive clutch engagement (vehicles equipped with manual transmission) or brake torque (vehicles equipped with automatic transmission). Traction and stability control systems are disabled when possible. An appropriate amount of wheel spin is encouraged to obtain peak performance. Lift-throttle up-shifts are rapidly executed with redlines observed. Drag strip "roll out" time and distance are NOT subtracted from published results.

Passing acceleration: With the transmission in third gear (manual-shift vehicles) or drive (automatic-equipped vehicles), and the vehicle cruising at 30mph, the time needed to accelerate to 70mph is measured. Corrections applied to all acceleration figures adjust results to standard weather conditions (60 degrees F, 29.92 in. mercury barometric pressure).

Braking: A pressure switch located on the brake pedal initiates recording of activation speed, deceleration rate, and distance information. Braking distance is mathematically adjusted to a 70-mph initiation speed. The deceleration rate reported is the peak g's measured during a stop.

Cornering: The test car is accelerated to the adhesion limit on a 400-foot-diameter skid pad circle. The peak g's reported are the averages observed during one-second intervals in each direction.

Speed in gears: The maximum observed velocity without exceeding the engine's redline rpm.

Philosophy: Automobile tests cars for a variety of reasons. While many makers offer a few snippets of acceleration, top-speed, and gas-mileage information, many do not. Conducting our own tests fills in gaps and adds trustworthy information about passing ability, cornering grip, and stopping performance. Having accurate performance profiles helps us pass judgment when we compare one contender to the next or draw conclusions at the end of a Four Seasons evaluation. Since there is no industry-wide standard for car testing, every maker has its own pet procedures. Some test with less than a full tank of fuel, some with two passengers and luggage aboard. Doing our own tests is the only means of leveling the playing field. Some publications strive for the quickest, fastest, or most spectacular results. We make no attempt to emulate quarter-mile drag strip results by subtracting the roll-out portion (the 0.3-0.4 seconds required to move the first foot) of the acceleration run. Drag strips divulge nothing but the speed achieved near the end of the quarter mile and the time required to accelerate that distance. Since the strip reports no other time-to-speed information, subtracting roll-out from 0-60 mph results is never warranted. Many magazines do adjust all of their acceleration results by subtracting the roll-out. We do not because, even though that yields quicker, more tantalizing performance figures, it presents a less accurate picture of the car's abilities.
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Old 12-23-2006, 07:19 AM   #9
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The June 2002 Consumer Reports states that an 02 Boxster will accelerate from 0-60 in 6.2 seconds. I've always used them as a pretty reliable standard on objective data. The owner's manual for my 00 Boxster states 6.5 seconds.

One thing to keep in mind is that some European car magazines use 0-62 as the standard.
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Old 12-23-2006, 09:55 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YellowPorscheMan2002
Why do magazines report faster times?
actually, it's usually the manufacturer that reports more conservative 0-60 numbers. i know that's usually the case with BMWs. for example, BMW claims that the Z4 3.0 pulls a 5.9 0-60... but most magazines put it at anywhere from 5.4 to 5.7.
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Old 12-23-2006, 10:30 AM   #11
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Hi,

As SD987 points out, it's all about the Testing Protocol and what the Manufacturer (or Magazine Review) is trying to achieve. But, absolute Truth is rarely the objective.

It may be for Marketing Purposes and aimed at a specific competitor, or it may have insurance implications (such as the many understated power/speed ratings of the '60s/'70s Muscle Cars), or it may be aimed at the Buyer where fudging on the numbers is enough to pique someone's interest into at least considering and Test Driving the car (which might not occur if the basic Stats are unappealing) in hopes that other allures (such as Styling, Creature Comforts, Provenance, etc.) will kick-in and take over somewhere in the decision process.

The Car may be stripped of excess weight, such as the spare tire, Stereo, FloorMats, even Fender Liners, Heat Shields, and excess fuel load. The car may be cleaned up aerodynamically by removing the Front Plate or testing the Car Top UP. The Tire Pressures may be super-inflated. The lightest optional Rim could be used. A European engine, DME or fuel may be used. Certainly, a Professional Driver on a closed course would be used. Then, favorable weather and altitude conditions are often part of the process as well (and when you're talking about 10ths of a sec., these can have a very definite effect). Even the total destruction of the drivetrain could be considered necessary to post stellar numbers (Lambo destroyed 3 engines in 4 days of testing in order to better the numbers of the competing Ferrari when testing the Mucielago).

Consumer Reports may be interested in Truth, but again, even their Testing Protocol is debatable...

Happy Motoring!... Jim'99

Last edited by MNBoxster; 12-23-2006 at 10:32 AM.
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Old 12-23-2006, 10:43 AM   #12
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Basically, these numbers should be taken with at least a +/-0.5sec "grain of salt" and are pretty meaningless except to separate between a 4.0sec super car, a 6.0sec sports car, an 8.0sec fast sedan, a 10sec sedan and a 12sec minivan -- and one doesn't really need numbers to make those distinctions, as eyeballing + hp/torque/weight data would suffice.

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Old 12-23-2006, 06:20 PM   #13
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Is there a difference between us and eu engines?



As SD987 points out, it's all about the Testing Protocol and what the Manufacturer (or Magazine Review) is trying to achieve. But, absolute Truth is rarely the objective.

It may be for Marketing Purposes and aimed at a specific competitor, or it may have insurance implications (such as the many understated power/speed ratings of the '60s/'70s Muscle Cars), or it may be aimed at the Buyer where fudging on the numbers is enough to pique someone's interest into at least considering and Test Driving the car (which might not occur if the basic Stats are unappealing) in hopes that other allures (such as Styling, Creature Comforts, Provenance, etc.) will kick-in and take over somewhere in the decision process.

The Car may be stripped of excess weight, such as the spare tire, Stereo, FloorMats, even Fender Liners, Heat Shields, and excess fuel load. The car may be cleaned up aerodynamically by removing the Front Plate or testing the Car Top UP. The Tire Pressures may be super-inflated. The lightest optional Rim could be used. A European engine, DME or fuel may be used. Certainly, a Professional Driver on a closed course would be used. Then, favorable weather and altitude conditions are often part of the process as well (and when you're talking about 10ths of a sec., these can have a very definite effect). Even the total destruction of the drivetrain could be considered necessary to post stellar numbers (Lambo destroyed 3 engines in 4 days of testing in order to better the numbers of the competing Ferrari when testing the Mucielago).

Consumer Reports may be interested in Truth, but again, even their Testing Protocol is debatable...

Happy Motoring!... Jim'99[/QUOTE]
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Old 12-23-2006, 07:17 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spongebob
Is there a difference between us and eu engines?
I don't think it's the engines more the octane ratings of the fuel and exhaust systems.
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Old 12-24-2006, 06:38 PM   #15
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I think many mags use power shifting to get higher times.


Anyone know what the real 0-60 on the 987 non-S is with a 5 speed?


I can't time myself but since I can get up to 67 mph in second gear, I only need to shift once.
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