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Old 11-07-2006, 03:12 PM   #1
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Break-in period

I know there have been a few threads about the issue of easy vs hard break-in but I wanted to bring this up again as my Porsche dealership told me to break my Boxster in the hard method and not worry about an easy break-in. I am now at 600 miles and just decided to start the hard break-in today. My salesguy pointed me to this website

http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm

which makes a convincing argument. He also says the oil should be changed rather quickly and with regular petroleum oils, not synthetic, during the break in to properly seat the rings, then change back to synthetics after 1500mi. Also, one thing I did notice today after revving it up to th 5k range was the engine gave off a smell that was very reminicent of the initial week I had the car, which I believe many referred to as the cosmolene burning off. Has anyone else had this same thing happen after their break-in period?

Sorry to drudge up another thread about the break in again.
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Old 11-07-2006, 03:22 PM   #2
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I've heard that also, I know for a fact that High Performance engines are broken in the same way by using standard oil rather than synthetic oils. I think it goes like this:

1000 miles Change oil and Filter
1000 more miles change oil and filter

Then use synthetic and change oil in regular intervals.
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Old 11-07-2006, 04:04 PM   #3
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While I am no expert, I have heard that it's not good to go from synthetic to mineral to synthetic oils.

So, the factory filled Mobil 1 is sythetic and you're going to go to mineral and then back again?
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Old 11-07-2006, 04:21 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RandallNeighbour
While I am no expert, I have heard that it's not good to go from synthetic to mineral to synthetic oils.

So, the factory filled Mobil 1 is sythetic and you're going to go to mineral and then back again?
I've heard that myth also but it isnt true, The engine is a machine and switching oils from normal oil to synthetic have any ill affects on the motor.

The reason you use regular non-synthetic oils for break-in is cause the standard oils aid in getting the bearings, piston rings and other oil lubricated parts to set into there groves...I think synthetic isnt used in high power application break-ins mainly cause it protects internal engine parts so well that it would take a very very very long time for the engine to break in and the piston rings wont sit well enough in there sleeves.
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Old 11-07-2006, 04:28 PM   #5
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Why not just follow what Porsche says in the owners manual? Or do you think they know nothing about engines??
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Old 11-07-2006, 04:36 PM   #6
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Probably a good idea.
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Old 11-07-2006, 05:19 PM   #7
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Nope not me, I will not leave that factory fill Mobil 1 for 20 K miles regardless. But that's about it for me differing with the owners manual.

I have followed the factory break in pretty religiously for the first 2k miles. Did pop it up to 5 k 5.5 K a couple of times but not much at all.

Car is now approaching 3k miles. The last 1000 have been a blast. Wow different car and I was throughly enjoying the car during the break in.

First real exercise was this last Sunday Palomar Mtn. South grade road just an up and down.

Last time I was up to the telescope was in my 928S4 a couple of years ago. That was fun! The Boxster was very close to a religious experience. It is a great road, traffic was light, beautiful 90 degree day top down. And I ditched my beautiful wife at the casino so no noises from the passenger seat!

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Old 11-09-2006, 07:21 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GmanMD
I know there have been a few threads about the issue of easy vs hard break-in but I wanted to bring this up again as my Porsche dealership told me to break my Boxster in the hard method and not worry about an easy break-in. I am now at 600 miles and just decided to start the hard break-in today. My salesguy pointed me to this website

http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm

which makes a convincing argument. He also says the oil should be changed rather quickly and with regular petroleum oils, not synthetic, during the break in to properly seat the rings, then change back to synthetics after 1500mi. Also, one thing I did notice today after revving it up to th 5k range was the engine gave off a smell that was very reminicent of the initial week I had the car, which I believe many referred to as the cosmolene burning off. Has anyone else had this same thing happen after their break-in period?

Sorry to drudge up another thread about the break in again.
I find it a bit scary that a Porsche sales guy is giving you advice that contradicts what Porsche actually says. Then again, I generally don't ask a sales guy for mechanical advice any more often than I ask the cable guy for stock tips.

As to the "break in secrets" - yes that has certainly made the rounds on this board. I didn't feel like searching for it to link to - but I'd advise looking it over. In short, however, those "secrets" were basically developed for high rev motorcycle engines.
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Old 11-09-2006, 07:43 AM   #9
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For me, things are simple: Qualification and motive. Porsche engineers are by far the most qualified to give break-in recommendations about Porsches, and those are summed up in the manual. The only thing that would prevent me from listening to those recommendations would be lack of honesty on their part i.e. if Porsche would somehow benefit from giving me the wrong advice. It's in Porsche's interest to minimize its warranty costs, which is aligned with my interest in having a trouble free ownership. Since our interests are aligned, I have no reason to question their honesty. Hence, I follow the recommended break-in procedure.

Btw, salespeople both lack the qualification AND have questionable motives. It's difficult for a salesperson to recommend the proper break-in procedure to a potential buyer who just flogged that "demo" at 6rpms during the test drive. He wouldn't be selling THAT demo to THAT customer for sure.

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Old 11-09-2006, 07:54 AM   #10
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I religiously followed the Porsche break-in period. And then added the extra step of an oil change at the 1,200 mile mark with Mobil 1. I also added a fuel cleaner with Techron during the very early stages of the break-in.
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Old 11-09-2006, 08:03 AM   #11
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Generally speaking, your dealer is an idiot.

I do like the 1000 mile change idea IF you intend to keep this car for beyond the warranty period.

Otherwise, don't bother.

And change your oil at 7500 intervals IMHO.

Find another dealer if this is indicative of what they know. The "hard break in" theory is nonsense.
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Old 11-09-2006, 08:10 AM   #12
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I do like the 1000 mile change idea IF you intend to keep this car for beyond the warranty period.
Brucelee, I think the "future owner" will see value in this too! So, I did it for my ownership experience (however long that may be) and in mind for the future person who owns my car.
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Old 11-09-2006, 08:51 AM   #13
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Hi,

The Hard Break-in advice is aimed specifically at engines, but these aren't the only components which break-in. The Transmission, Brakes, Wheel Bearings, Bushings, Shocks, Fuel Pump, Oil Pump, Coolant Pump, Alternator Bearing, etc. all establish wear patterns during this critical period. Easier is better in my experience.

On an engine rebuild, the scenario is different and a Hard Break-in is more appropriate. But you're only dealing with the engine and not the entire unit.

Using Mineral Oil during the break-in was done at a time when Synthetics were thought to be more slippery, which just isn't so with todays better refined organic Oils. Also, it was cheaper to replace.

No one has ever suffered from following the manufacturer's advice on the break-in. Stick with that. I'm not even going to go into what Salesmen do or do not know...

Happy Motoring!... Jim'99
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Old 11-09-2006, 09:05 AM   #14
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For me, things are simple: Qualification and motive. Porsche engineers are by far the most qualified to give break-in recommendations about Porsches, and those are summed up in the manual. The only thing that would prevent me from listening to those recommendations would be lack of honesty on their part i.e. if Porsche would somehow benefit from giving me the wrong advice. It's in Porsche's interest to minimize its warranty costs, which is aligned with my interest in having a trouble free ownership. Since our interests are aligned, I have no reason to question their honesty. Hence, I follow the recommended break-in procedure.

Couldn't agree with this more, and for the same reason I have followed and will follow the 20K oil change/service interval. Other 987 owners follow the break-in but not the servicing recommendations, which makes me wonder why they selectively second-guess Porsche engineers.

Ricklin, having a white 06 S myself, I'd be interested in seeing pics of yours with the blue/blue combo. BTW, do you frequent the UTC area at all? I saw a white 987 S getting on the 5 north off of Genessee and am wondering if that was you.
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Old 11-09-2006, 09:21 AM   #15
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"Couldn't agree with this more, and for the same reason I have followed and will follow the 20K oil change/service interval. Other 987 owners follow the break-in but not the servicing recommendations, which makes me wonder why they selectively second-guess Porsche engineers."

Well, here is a challenge. Run the oil for 20K MILES and then take a small sample and send it to Blackstone labs for analysis. I think this is a $15 charge or so.

Then report back to us. I think you will be literally amazed at what our dear Porsche engineers have been recommending.

To save you some trouble, using M1 0W-40 oil, the UOA I have seen indicate that this oil is SHOT at about 10K miles tops.

That is NOT true of Red Line oil which is likely good for 15K.

But hey, it is your engine.

Goodluck.
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Old 11-09-2006, 09:38 AM   #16
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"Couldn't agree with this more, and for the same reason I have followed and will follow the 20K oil change/service interval. Other 987 owners follow the break-in but not the servicing recommendations, which makes me wonder why they selectively second-guess Porsche engineers."

The oil interval recommendation is SLIGHTLY different. There IS a reason for Porsche to be recommending longer intervals as that lowers the projected maintenance costs (cost to own) and makes them more competitive in the market. Since shorter intervals don't hurt, many owners decide to alleviate the risk from that slight "interest misalignment" by buying insurance (keeping shorter intervals). Nothing wrong with that.

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Old 11-09-2006, 09:41 AM   #17
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Well, here is a challenge. Run the oil for 20K MILES and then take a small sample and send it to Blackstone labs for analysis. I think this is a $15 charge or so.

Then report back to us. I think you will be literally amazed at what our dear Porsche engineers have been recommending.

To save you some trouble, using M1 0W-40 oil, the UOA I have seen indicate that this oil is SHOT at about 10K miles tops.

That is NOT true of Red Line oil which is likely good for 15K.


..umm, what exactly would running your test indicate? In order to be of any value, sampling would have to be done at intervals (say, every 5k), along the way. No doubt the oil degrades but is the degradation at 20k so much more versus 15k, or 10k or 5k to justify an earlier interval? At what point does the oil degradation justify changing it? I'm guessing both Porsche and the engine oil companies have run just a couple of these tests. Since car companies often provide guidelines to protect the consumer from his/her self I'd say the 20k interval is actually understated.

And your response doesn't answer the question posed by z12358. If a shorter interval was required, why wouldn't Porsche simply make that the interval? There's nothing to gain with a shorter interval, no prestige is bestowed on a marque for having the longest oil change interval, nor is there "shame" in a shorter interval. There's only the downside of increased warranty claims, as noted by z. And there's only downside in a long interval for a company trying to sell oil. Yes, M1 wants to be known as a "long lasting oil", but that reputation could be garnered with a 10k interval.

I know you enjoy bashing Porsche on maintenance/reliability but there's little credibility in a Porsche/Oil conspiracy. If there is a conspiracy, Mercedes (my SLK interval is 13k) must be "in on it" too, then.
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Old 11-09-2006, 09:53 AM   #18
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"...no prestige is bestowed on a marque for having the longest oil change interval, nor is there "shame" in a shorter interval. ..."

Perhaps I wasn't clear enough. Actually, as I said, Porsche DOES gain by recommending a longer interval, as it lowers the perceived cost-to-own (maintenance costs) of their cars in the eyes of potential buyers, thus making them more marketable and competitive. Porsche may have decided that the slight increase in wear (thus increase in warranty claims) is worth that increase in marketability. The equation for the owners is different, as they only care about minimizing wear. Whenever there's such misalignment of interests, it's worth to be more careful and buy insurance (change oil more frequently).

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Old 11-09-2006, 09:53 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SD987
Well, here is a challenge. Run the oil for 20K MILES and then take a small sample and send it to Blackstone labs for analysis. I think this is a $15 charge or so.

Then report back to us. I think you will be literally amazed at what our dear Porsche engineers have been recommending.

To save you some trouble, using M1 0W-40 oil, the UOA I have seen indicate that this oil is SHOT at about 10K miles tops.

That is NOT true of Red Line oil which is likely good for 15K.


..umm, what exactly would running your test indicate? In order to be of any value, sampling would have to be done at intervals (say, every 5k), along the way. No doubt the oil degrades but is the degradation at 20k so much more versus 15k, or 10k or 5k to justify an earlier interval? At what point does the oil degradation justify changing it? I'm guessing both Porsche and the engine oil companies have run just a couple of these tests.

And your response doesn't answer the question posed by z12358. If a shorter interval was required, why wouldn't Porsche simply state that? There's nothing to gain with a shorter interval, no prestige is bestowed on a marque for having the longest oil change interval, nor is there "shame" in a shorter interval. There's only the downside of increased warranty claims, as noted by z. And there's only downside in a long interval for a company trying to sell oil. Yes, M1 wants to be known as a "long lasting oil", but that reputation could be garnered with a 10k interval.

I know you enjoy bashing Porsche on maintenance/reliability but there's little credibility in a Porsche/Oil conspiracy. If there is a conspiracy, Mercedes (my SLK interval is 13k) must be "in on it" to, then.
No conspiracy and no bashing. And my credibility is fine thanks.

Here are several quick points.

1-The point was raised above that Porsche was SOUNDLY criticized for years for the cost of routine maintainence. One way to counter that was to move the period out a bit. On things like spark plugs etc, no big deal.

However, your theory about how you are sure they tested oil quality etc. is just that, a theory. Moreover, Porsche has shown quite clearly that they are really concerned about warranty costs, not ownership costs. The "price" of using shot oil shows up later, not during the warranty period. The price is excess wear.

Re: the oil testing, frankly that has been done to death on Bob is the Oil Guy's website. The oil analysis shows things like wear metals in the oil, additives left in the oil, viscosity retention and the like. These are compared to the oil when new.

Bottom line, if you want to ride say 10K miles with oil that has basically had it, go ahead and do it.

It is scant solace indeed when your Box engine is shot and you comfort yourself that you followed those brilliant engineers recommendations.

Of course, we don't know who made these recommendations, the engineers or the finance VP.

BTW-My service tech admits off the record that the 20 K is bogus.

But hey, it is your car. Risk the 15Grand engine on basis of faith in the factory.
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Old 11-09-2006, 09:57 AM   #20
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Smile

PS- Mobil has recently changed the formula on their Extended Protection oil such that they are not really "fully synthetic." No word on the 0W-40 oil yet but more to follow.

All the more reason to suspect the 20K deal.
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