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Old 11-02-2019, 06:11 PM   #1
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Oil Change Diaster

Well, a good friend and my old Battery Commander has the same year Porsche as mine, 2000 Base ( he's the reason I bought mine). Well, we did a oil change on his today, and when he put the drain plug back, he didn't use the metal washer and TORQUED it to death with a Allen wrench. The plug is a cheap Chinese aluminum with a 8mm hex head. When I realized he didn't use the washer, we decided to drain the oil in a clean tub to reuse and use the washer. Guess what is stripped and useless. So, is it possible to remove the plug with a easy out. I didn't want to get to destructive until we had all the needed parts to fix if it comes to that. He is ordering a new oil pan, gasket maker, drain plug and washer. I do not think it will be much of a job dropping the pan and replacing everything that needs to be fixed. Am I being overly optimistic or is it a pretty easy job. Any hints or " try this" would be appreciated.

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Old 11-02-2019, 06:15 PM   #2
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Search the forum this was discussed last week.
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Old 11-02-2019, 06:26 PM   #3
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I read that one, was hoping to get the drain plug out. The hex head in the plug is whats stripped. Oil Pan is good ( for now). If I can figure out a way to remove the plug without dropping the pan I would be happy. But I am planning on having to replace the oil pan, gasket, drain plug and washer. He is a good mechanic unless wrenching on his own car. Then he gets to wound up.
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Old 11-02-2019, 06:35 PM   #4
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Are the OEM drain plus steel or at least Heavy duty. All the aftermarket plugs I have seen look like they are made of tinfoil. Even the new one I purchased to install has me a bit worried. It just feels cheap
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Old 11-02-2019, 07:00 PM   #5
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Are the OEM drain plus steel or at least Heavy duty. All the aftermarket plugs I have seen look like they are made of tinfoil. Even the new one I purchased to install has me a bit worried. It just feels cheap
The OEM plugs are aluminum.
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Old 11-02-2019, 07:01 PM   #6
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You may be able to gently tap an M10 triple square wrench in there to get enough grip to get it out.
M10 Triple Square:


The OEM plugs are soft aluminum. That way Arty guys don't crack the pan when they torque them in.

It is written in marker on a parts shelf in my garage:
  • Oil Plug - 50 NM (Magnetic/steel Plug - 19 FT)
  • Filter - 25 NM
  • Wheel Lug 130 NM/93 Ft
  • Spark Plug - 30 NM
  • Caliper - 63 Ft
Use those 'till you find a better source.
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Last edited by 78F350; 11-03-2019 at 06:14 AM.
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Old 11-03-2019, 04:49 AM   #7
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Have you tried using a pair of vice-grips? Grab the edge of the plug... back it out.

I once stripped my plug... but managed to get it out. Promptly went to Auto Zone... dropped a few bucks on a steel plug... haven't had a problem since.

Oh. Never have I torqued my plugs when doing an oil change... on any car ever I've owned. 100% has worked out for me... and never a weep or leak.
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Old 11-03-2019, 04:50 AM   #8
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That way Arty guys don't crack the pan when they torque them in.
Thanx, Did you know if you put a ARTY guy in a empty room with only two marbles, tens minutes later one will be broken and the other dented
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Old 11-03-2019, 04:52 AM   #9
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Tried the vise grips, plug sits to flush to get a decent bite.
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Old 11-03-2019, 04:55 AM   #10
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That way Arty guys don't crack the pan when they torque them in.


So you've been to this place? LOL

https://www.artysautoservice.com/


Actually, I get your gist behind the "Arty guys" comment, but where did it come from?
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Old 11-03-2019, 05:02 AM   #11
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My very first DIY oil change the previous mechanic had torqued the hell out of the plug. I was able to get it out using a screw extractor and a wrench plus about 6' of pipe slipped over the wrench handle for extra torque. The oil pan itself was fine, and I haven't had any issues since this happened about 30k miles ago.
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Last edited by rick3000; 11-03-2019 at 05:04 AM.
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Old 11-03-2019, 06:00 AM   #12
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...Actually, I get your gist behind the "Arty guys" comment, but where did it come from?
The OP said, " ...my old Battery Commander " which to me, says he's one of these guys:


They do not do 'finesse' well.
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Old 11-03-2019, 06:31 AM   #13
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The OP said, " ...my old Battery Commander " which to me, says he's one of these guys:


They do not do 'finesse' well.
ahh! haha! Thanks!
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Old 11-03-2019, 07:37 AM   #14
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I'd try the 10mm torx socket first, it that doesn't work, drill it and use an easy out. It would be nice if you don't need to drill all the way thru the drain plug, but if you do, catch the first cup and discard, then catch the rest of the oil.

I was gonna suggest pulling the pan completely before you drill, but that would be just incredibly messy.

I always use a brand new, high quality drill for drilling and extracting. Done a few in the past year.
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Old 11-03-2019, 07:42 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by Brian in Tucson View Post
I'd try the 10mm torx socket first, it that doesn't work, drill it and use an easy out. It would be nice if you don't need to drill all the way thru the drain plug, but if you do, catch the first cup and discard, then catch the rest of the oil.

I was gonna suggest pulling the pan completely before you drill, but that would be just incredibly messy.

I always use a brand new, high quality drill for drilling and extracting. Done a few in the past year.
If I was drilling and therefore getting metal fragments in the oil, I would replace ALL of the oil. I wouldn't rick possible engine damage for less than $100 of oil, Hell if you get M1 at wallyworld, its $50 for 10 quatrts
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Old 11-03-2019, 07:51 AM   #16
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If I was drilling and therefore getting metal fragments in the oil, I would replace ALL of the oil. I wouldn't rick possible engine damage for less than $100 of oil, Hell if you get M1 at wallyworld, its $50 for 10 quatrts
You're right, of course.
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Old 11-03-2019, 09:07 AM   #17
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Obviously since it has oil, I'm assuming it's driveable. Why not take to a welding shop and have them see if they can weld a nut on it? Shouldn't cost that much.

Last edited by piper6909; 11-03-2019 at 09:12 AM.
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Old 11-03-2019, 10:25 AM   #18
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I was one of those guys for 26 years. Not a arty piece that I haven't exercised the recoil on. Last one was the M777 in Afghanistan. Used that one ALOT.
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Old 11-03-2019, 12:53 PM   #19
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I had the same issue once and I also had an aluminum plug, so I went to the auto parts store and bought a flat head chisel. I used to work at a quick lube shop, so I went under the car and hammered the chisel at an ideal angle where it would not break anything but have enough bite to get the plug rotating.

Last edited by JimmyBad; 11-03-2019 at 01:03 PM.
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Old 11-03-2019, 01:35 PM   #20
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I had the same issue once and I also had an aluminum plug, so I went to the auto parts store and bought a flat head chisel. I used to work at a quick lube shop, so I went under the car and hammered the chisel at an ideal angle where it would not break anything but have enough bite to get the plug rotating.
Started doing that, and will probably end up doing it. I just didn't want to get too destructive until we had replacement parts on hand. Did not want his Boxster up on the lift for a week or two while he sources parts. Once a new drain plug, oil pan, gasket material and oil are here. then we can get progressively more aggressive. It is drivable now and will be for a few thousand miles until next oil change is needed.

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