Go Back   986 Forum - for Porsche Boxster & Cayman Owners > Porsche Boxster & Cayman Forums > Boxster General Discussions

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-01-2014, 05:02 PM   #1
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: UK
Posts: 874
Coolant tank replacement query

It's official, my tank is leaking. I've been reading the various guides and posts and I'm a little confused.

Some of the guides say you have to access some of the hoses from below. Some seem to disconnect all the hoses inside the engine compartment. Others seem to disconnect all but one on the trunk / boot side, with just one from the engine compartment and none from below. Some people spent six hours, gave up and had the car trailered to a shop and charged $1,100. Others did it first time in an hour and a half.

In short, what the hell is going on?!

Also, can I do this on my own?

__________________
Manual '00 3.2 S Arctic Silver
pothole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2014, 05:12 PM   #2
Registered User
 
golonaus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: chi-town
Posts: 328
Garage
Its not that hard
you will access some hoses from trunk some from engine compartment
it took me 3 hours drinking coronas meanwhile
__________________
99' with 3.4l engine. ROW tune. SAI delete
golonaus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2014, 05:35 PM   #3
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: UK
Posts: 874
On your own without a helper?
__________________
Manual '00 3.2 S Arctic Silver
pothole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2014, 05:44 PM   #4
Registered User
 
Steve Tinker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Queensland, Australia
Posts: 1,522
Potty......
Changed mine last year and depending how supple or what tools you have makes a difference.
The removal is not difficult (I used 101 Projects for your Boxster manual) as you can loosen the old tank and pull it forward to loosen the connection hoses.
The installation is somewhat more difficult. Lots of people in the US buy the special tool that can remotely open / close the steel springs that retains the coolant pipes. Nowhere in Australia had anyone even heard of these tools, so I had to use pliars to remove the original clamps & then reinstall with screw type S/S clamps.
The only way I could push on the hoses and hold the clamps to tighten was from the bottom which means you have to remove the 2 x diagonal cross members and alloy plate under the gearbox. This was the knuckle grazing, sweat inducing part which took over an hour in 35 deg C temps just to connect the pipework.
Some people can get the clamps / pipes on from the boot (trunk), but I couldn't get enough play on the pipes to accomplish this.
Notes:
1) Be carefull with the oil filler and dipstick pipes - they become brittle with age & break easily.
2) You have to drill out the new coolant tank where the dipstick goes through - 20mm hole I think.
3) It may be a good time to check all the other coolant componants (pump, T.stat, coolant, drive belt etc) while the system is empty.
4) A helper is advantageous when replacing the pipework.
5) It took me over 5 hours to install & fill with coolant, but if I were to do it again with the right tool, maybe half that time.
__________________
2001 Boxster S (triple black). Sleeping easier with LN Engineering/Flat 6 IMS upgrade, low temp thermostat & underspeed pulley.
2001 MV Agusta F4.

Last edited by Steve Tinker; 03-01-2014 at 05:48 PM.
Steve Tinker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2014, 06:44 PM   #5
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Winnipeg MB
Posts: 2,486
I have that special hose clamp tool and I have to say it is worth whatever you have to pay to get one. My time on the job was a little over three hours to take the old one out, and about the same to put the new one back in. No helper. It's not really the kind of job you need a helper for. I did it from up top and used Pedro's guide mostly. If you're going to drain the coolant to do this then the Airlift vacuum tool is also well worth the money, providing you have a compressor to operate it. You'll also need a rad hose pick

This was a nasty, ugly, lots of bad words, cranky job. You need to be mechanically adept and have good tools to tackle it.
__________________
'99 black 986
Mark_T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2014, 06:56 PM   #6
Rennzenn
 
j.fro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Virginia
Posts: 1,356
Garage
This was a nasty, ugly, lots of bad words, cranky job. You need to be mechanically adept and have good tools to tackle it.[/QUOTE]
+1
But it is DIY doable, just like everything else on the 986/996 platform. Read all the DIY instructions you can find, set aside a whole day, be patient, take breaks, and you will get it done right. If you can't get the clamp tool, be sure you have small vice grips or a long set of needle nose pliers. Put your favorite drink in a cooler full of ice. You'll need the ice for your knuckles. And some band-aids.
__________________
Rennzenn
Jfro@rennzenn.com
j.fro is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2014, 06:59 PM   #7
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: UK
Posts: 874
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Tinker View Post
The only way I could push on the hoses and hold the clamps to tighten was from the bottom which means you have to remove the 2 x diagonal cross members and alloy plate under the gearbox. This was the knuckle grazing, sweat inducing part which took over an hour in 35 deg C temps just to connect the pipework.
Some people can get the clamps / pipes on from the boot (trunk), but I couldn't get enough play on the pipes to accomplish this.

This is what is confusing me.

From another thread here, one guy removed three pipes from inside the trunk/boot connecting the the tank to the feed-through plate, attaching them to the new tank as he went along:





I'm struggling to understand why you would disconnect them from inside the engine compartment. From what I can see, there's only one that you must deal with from inside the engine compartment. But obviously I haven't done the job yet. But am just confused by apparently contradicting advice that variously says you need to get underneath, you can do it all from the top, you need to drain all the coolant, you just drain the tank, you disconnect all the pipes in the engine compartment, you only disconnect one pipe inside the engine compartment.
__________________
Manual '00 3.2 S Arctic Silver
pothole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2014, 07:11 PM   #8
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Winnipeg MB
Posts: 2,486
There's usually more than one way of doing a job. You just need to dive in and figure out which way will work best for you.

You definitely do not need to drain all the coolant - just the tank. I replaced the sensor also.

I had a look from underneath, but the only thing I did under there was remove and replace the overflow tube. The rest I did from up top but, YMMV. I did not remove the braces and plate.

Here is Pedro's DIY: http://www.pedrosgarage.com/Site_3/Replace_Coolant_Reservoir.html
__________________
'99 black 986
Mark_T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2014, 08:20 PM   #9
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Florida
Posts: 2,087
It's a topside job.

I had similar questions before I started the job on my car. Once you dig in, it will quickly become apparent which things you can do in the trunk and which are done in the engine compartment.

Don't fret too much, just dig in.

dghii is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On




All times are GMT -8. The time now is 11:47 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2018 Pelican Parts, LLC - Posts may be archived for display on the Pelican Parts Website -    DMCA Registered Agent Contact Page