Go Back   986 Forum - for Porsche Boxster & Cayman Owners > Porsche Boxster & Cayman Forums > Boxster General Discussions

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 09-15-2005, 10:18 AM   #1
bmussatti
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Storing Boxster for Winter

What can be, and should be done, to a Boxster for 5 months storage in the midwest? It won't be driven November-March.

  Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2005, 10:31 AM   #2
fab
Registered User
 
fab's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Boston MA
Posts: 386
This will be my first time storing my car in New England winter.
I was told to by porsche service rep. to do:
1. add dry gas and fill your tank
2. not sure what they call it but it keeps the battery charged without having to remove it from the car.
3. DO NOT recline your convert. top if the temp is below 50. Assuming that you have a plastic rear view window.
fab is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2005, 10:46 AM   #3
Registered User
 
Perfectlap's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 8,709
leave it up to a couple of guys from Chicago and Mass to start talking about
cold weather! 10 demerits for you guys!
__________________
GT3 Recaro Seats - Boxster Red
GT3 Aero / Carrera 18" 5 spoke / Potenza RE-11
Fabspeed Headers & Noise Maker
BORN: March 2000 - FINLAND
IMS#1 REPLACED: April 2010 - NEW JERSEY -- LNE DUAL ROW
Perfectlap is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2005, 10:47 AM   #4
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: San Diego, California
Posts: 874
You may also want to get your 2000 mile break-in completed before putting the car away....Can't think of a "technical" reason for this, but it sounds "right" in my mind....
__________________
http://i7.tinypic.com/24ovngk.jpghttp://i7.tinypic.com/24ow0id.jpg

06 987S- Sold
Carrara White / Black / Black/Stone Grey Two-tone

05 987 5-speed - Sold
Midnight Blue Metallic / Metropol Blue / Sand Beige

06 MB SLK350- Lease escapee
Iridium Silver Metallic / Black

We've heard that a million monkeys at a million keyboards could produce the complete works of Shakespeare; now, thanks to the Internet, we know that is not true. - Robert Wilensky
SD987 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2005, 11:21 AM   #5
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 435
I think the California people prepare for winter by opening the garage door, reclining the top, driving, and smiling.
In SC I have to put on a jacket, recline the top, drive, and turn the heat on to the feet.

On a more serious note, humidity is a factor. Relative humidity should be in the midrange around 50% - too dry will accelerate drying of rubber things. Too damp (over 60% for more than a couple of days) can lead to mold growth. In cold climates where you are heating in the winter, too dry is usually the problem unless you have leaks, wet basements, etc. Heating the air tends to dry it out. So, anywhere in the 40-60% range is ok, but 50% is recommended.
My comments are on storing things in general - anybody know if Porsche has anything specific?

Lifting the car off the tires is good, or rotating the contact patch regulary.

In a younger life, I stored a car improperly for 2 years, outside, while I was working overseas. Didn't run well at all when I got back.
limoncello is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2005, 11:29 AM   #6
bmussatti
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Talking

Hey Limoncello, are you talking about a Boxster here or a nice Napa Cabernet?
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2005, 11:46 AM   #7
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Southern Cali
Posts: 494
If its too humid, throw in some Paper towel rolls and toilet paper rolls. They act as a very good dehumidifier inside a closed car.

I would start the car and run it too operating temp once every two weeks.

Also jack up the car and rotate the tires to avoid flat spots once every 4 weeks.

KRZ
KRZTACO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2005, 11:51 AM   #8
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: San Diego, California
Posts: 874
Check page 200 of your 987s Owners Manual.
__________________
http://i7.tinypic.com/24ovngk.jpghttp://i7.tinypic.com/24ow0id.jpg

06 987S- Sold
Carrara White / Black / Black/Stone Grey Two-tone

05 987 5-speed - Sold
Midnight Blue Metallic / Metropol Blue / Sand Beige

06 MB SLK350- Lease escapee
Iridium Silver Metallic / Black

We've heard that a million monkeys at a million keyboards could produce the complete works of Shakespeare; now, thanks to the Internet, we know that is not true. - Robert Wilensky
SD987 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2005, 01:45 PM   #9
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 7,240
Storing one's boxster for winter is a very sad thing indeed. I am now happy I live in the South for once.
__________________
'97 Boxster (Black Hole for 42,000 Dead Presidents and counting) - 122k
New motor, transmission, suspension, and on and on and on it goes...
RandallNeighbour is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2005, 04:02 PM   #10
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Southern California
Posts: 173
Rather than jacking up the car, couldn't the tires just be rolled a quarter turn? Unless the garage isn't big enough, you could pull the car all the way in, then every couple weeks back it up a quarter turn. After three such moves, pull it back all the way in. Rinse, repeat.
SoCal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2005, 04:05 PM   #11
Registered User
 
donv's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: NW of Boston, MA
Posts: 697
OK, it is a bit early to be thinking of this, but planning is always better than procrastinating...

I've overwintered mine in the garage each year since new. Still on the same battery and no other issues at all other than SigO comments on why the Boxster gets to stay inside all winter .

What I do, if at all possible to get these all to align on the same day:

  • Wash car completely, do detailing spray, etc. (I'm a Zaino guy so far)
  • Go for one last real blast with the car (and repeat if time allows )
  • Add "StaBil" fuel stabilizer to tank and fill it just before driving home
  • Raise the tire pressure all around to near max sidewall listed pressure, or use compressor at home to do same
  • Once home, do the annual oil/filter change with the hot car, check all fluids, etc.
  • Place perforated Yogurt containers w/Moth crystals in them in key points in the car - to convince the mice there's a better place to set up for the winter
  • Connect Porsche battery maintainer and close-er-up
  • Put car cover on and wish it a good sleep

I don't start the car at all during the winter. Combustion generates water and water leads to corrosion, etc. I don't mean to question anybody's religion re: this, we all have our beliefs. I originally planned to be a "run periodically" person, but I came to see a different light. I do check the tire pressure periodically.

In spring, I just remove the cover, battery maintainer, moth crystals and let down the tire pressures to 29/36, start the car and drive... the slight flat spotting on the tires disappears once they're brought up to temp with some spirited driving. The first drive with the shiny clean ride (of course, after the first good rain has washed the salt off the roads) is fantastic. Almost like falling in love all over again.
__________________
2001 Lapis/Black/Black, PSM, Rear Speaker Kit, Optima...
donv is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2005, 04:13 PM   #12
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: New York
Posts: 146
I picked up the battery maintainer at Suncoast for $55, well below MSRP.
longislander1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2005, 04:44 PM   #13
bmussatti
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Thanks, Donv! Great advice. Do I really need to worry about mice?
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2005, 06:32 PM   #14
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota, USA
Posts: 3,308
Hi,

1st Post here, happy to join the Forum. The best way to store any car for the winter is to do the following:

1. Change the oil just prior to storage. Oil absorbes moisture (a natural byproduct of combustion) and if old oil is left in the motor, moisture will evaporate out of the oil and condense on the engine internals causing corrosion. Also, oil becomes acidic with use and should be changed for this reason also. Change oil, start engine and run just long enough for the oil to circulate, then shut off for the season to prevent a buildup of moisture. If planning to change the tranny fluid in the coming season, it's also a good idea to do this now for basically the same reason.

2. Loosen the spark plugs and shoot either fogger oil (aerosol - NOT WD-40!) or a squirt of motor oil from a can into the sparkplug holes - about 1 tsp. This will prevent the rings from corroding and seizing to the cylinder walls over the winter. Upon initial startup in spring, oil will burn off in the 1st few minutes. I have seen piston rings seize to the Cylinder walls and tear-up on initial start-up requiring a rebuild to correct it, so I always follow this step.

3. Increase tire pressures to 50PSI. This will prevent flatspotting and leaks. The tire pressure will drop with ambient temp. Some will say to put the car on blocks, but with modern independent suspension, it's not good to leave it 'unsprung' for long periods. If you want to get really anal, fill the tires with Nitrogen. This is a Dry Gas and will prevent Dry Rot. Nitrogen can be obtained from any welding supply.

4. Store desiccants in the car. These can be purchased and laid on the floor front/back. This prevents mildew from growing and keeps leather from deteriorating due to accumulated moisture. Also, add an open Box of Baking Soda to absorb any odors which may accumulate. The 'Car Cacoons' currently being sold are very good for long term storage and use only a couple bucks electricity the entire season, also reduces door dings and the like. Absent this, use a quality car Cover.

5. Wash the car - don't allow pollution, Tree Sap etc. to work on the paint through the winter.

6. Remove battery from the car and put on a maintainer, preferably inside where it's warm. Be sure to allow plenty of ventilation to prevent Hydrogen Gas buildup.

7. Place the car on a sheet of Vinyl laid out on the garage floor. Make sure the vinyl extends 2 feet from any edge of the car. Garage floors seep moisture through the winter which can condense on the underside of the car, suspension, etc. causing corrosion.

8. Fill Gas Tank with Fresh, Premium fuel. A partial tank will corrode from moist air. Plus, it'll probably be cheaper than filling it next season. Use a stabilizer if you choose, but with Premium Gas, it's usually not necessary. If using a stabilizer, only add it when refueling so it thoroughly mixes with the gas, then run the car home so that the stabilzer can also work it's way through the entire fuel system.

9 Check Anti-freeze to be sure sufficient for temps anticipated - not relevent to an A/C Flat 6. Also, add a cup or so of denatured alcohol to the Windshield Washer Reservoir and run to circulate it - this insures that the water in the system does not freeze and ruin the pump.

10. Leave the car out of gear and with the Handbrake Off. If your garage is not level, or you worry about the car being 'rolled', place a brick under the front tire to prevent the car from rolling. Emergency Brake system and Calipers have been known to seize over a season of non-use. If they are engaged, it can be very difficult to dis-engage them (you may need to disassemble the caliper or mechanism to free it). On the other hand, if they are dis-engaged and seize, the hydraulic pressure and/or mechanical advantage of a cable/lever system is often enough to loosen them up again.

11. It may also help to place a couple of Mouse Traps strategically under the car, such as where the exhaust outlet(s), Frame openings, etc. are located. This can prevent something from Moving In to your car over the season. Mice will eat Plastic, Leather and Rubber, in addition to making a mess in general.


I live in Mpls./St. Paul - similar winter conditions. This is how I store each of my cars - Boxster, Lotus Esprit, 240Z, Formula Vee. Hope this helps...

Happy Motoring!... Jim'99

Last edited by MNBoxster; 09-16-2005 at 06:24 AM.
MNBoxster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2005, 05:52 AM   #15
Registered User
 
tqtran's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Indiana, USA
Posts: 416
If you can not get to an outlet for a battery maintainer then just pop the front trunk open a bit and leave it open a crack, let the battery die and just replace it in the spring, they are not that expensive....
tqtran is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2005, 07:48 PM   #16
Registered User
 
donv's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: NW of Boston, MA
Posts: 697
The first year I didn't do the moth crystals. I had a roasted acorn and sunflower seeds smell for days when I started the car in the spring. They love nesting on top of the engine. Same situation with my earlier Olds Delta 88 convertible, but that was a beater I didn't care about... now I try to make it a lousy place to live (they hate strong smells). Maybe I have more mice than usual (live on a woodsy/rural road) - they nest in the snowblower between uses some times! The idea of placing traps around is a good one, no harm in trying to keep them from even getting near enough to think about moving in.

If you're going to take the "let it die" route w/the battery, you should definitely pull it instead of leaving it in the car. If your winters are cold enough, the battery will not only die but freeze. If it cracks, at a thaw you'll have an acid shower in the battery compartment... no fun. The Porsche battery maintainer is cheaper than a battery and only requires you to access the lighter socket - less work than even opening the hood.

I like the idea of oiling the cylinders through the spark plug hole... will have to think about that for this winter.
__________________
2001 Lapis/Black/Black, PSM, Rear Speaker Kit, Optima...
donv is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2005, 04:12 AM   #17
Registered User
 
Pilot2519j's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Huntersville, NC
Posts: 655
Exclamation Use it every day that's what they are made for

Lets not forget elevator music for the car to combat loneliness. The thought of parting with my Boxster because of inclement weather is absurd I use it as my everyday car ! I live in NY where it also snows, sleets and rains in the winter, true not as much as other parts of the country. I m confident that the Porsche designers took the weather into account.
__________________
Pluralitas non est ponenda sine neccesitate
Pilot2519j is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2005, 05:48 AM   #18
Registered User
 
Brucelee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 8,083
Winter, winter ................what's that?

Brucelee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2005, 09:49 AM   #19
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Ohio
Posts: 28
I'm glad someone posted about winter storage. I have to store my Box (this is my first Box) outside on a concrete pad once mid Nov rolls around; does anyone have a good suggestion for heavy duty car cover; I live in the Midwest. No room in my garage eventhough have 3.5 car garage need the space for my work car where I have to load and unload everyday and don't fancy doing it when its freezing outside - from end of March to mid Nov Box stays in garage.
willche is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2005, 02:39 PM   #20
bmussatti
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Willche:

Porsche has an Outdoor Car Cover- part # 987-044-000-02. Hope this helps.

  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On




All times are GMT -8. The time now is 11:40 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2018 Pelican Parts, LLC - Posts may be archived for display on the Pelican Parts Website -    DMCA Registered Agent Contact Page