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Old 10-20-2009, 10:59 AM   #1
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accusump and dry sump

so i was looking at the LN engineering spin on oil filter adapter and i saw the accusump in one of the pictures. what does it do? is it a part for a dry sump oil system or is it something else? also what are the benefits of a dry sump besides not starving the engine on high G turns?
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Old 10-20-2009, 02:22 PM   #2
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More than you ever wanted to know...
http://www.racerpartswholesale.com/downloads/Accusump%20Installation%20Instructions.pdf
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Old 10-20-2009, 04:12 PM   #3
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The M96 engine is not dry sump. The owner's manual says "integrated dry sump" i.e. wet sump. On the track, especially in prolonged high-G loading with sticky tires, it's common to have oil starvation, leading to spun rod bearings.

Use of an accusump isn't anything new. Porsche 356 guys (and 944, etc. anything with a wet sump), have been using them to prevent oil starvation on the track. The accusump is an oil accumulator, storing some volume of oil at pressure to be released as engine oil pressure drops, preventing or at least prolonging an oil starvation event.
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Old 10-20-2009, 08:36 PM   #4
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would the accusump or similar system help prolong engine life for normal day to day and occasional thrash type driving or would it just be a conversation piece?



also getting a whole aftermarket drysump for the boxster how much does that run and does having cooler oil give a much greater benefit? and how cool should the oil be or is there no min oil temp? seems to me the oil needs to be hot to some degree or else it wouldnt hold the engine "grime" very well

the heat and cold question is already acknowledging the fact that the dry sump will prevent engine starvation in high G scenarios or what have you
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Old 10-21-2009, 05:04 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by Lobo1186
would the accusump or similar system help prolong engine life for normal day to day and occasional thrash type driving or would it just be a conversation piece?



also getting a whole aftermarket drysump for the boxster how much does that run and does having cooler oil give a much greater benefit? and how cool should the oil be or is there no min oil temp? seems to me the oil needs to be hot to some degree or else it wouldnt hold the engine "grime" very well

the heat and cold question is already acknowledging the fact that the dry sump will prevent engine starvation in high G scenarios or what have you
First, the M96 has an “integrated” or pseudo dry sump system that employs dry sump like oil scavengers to move the oil around inside the engine; but uses a conventional wet sump to hold the oil beneath the engine.

Beside preventing oil starvation under hard cornering/braking, the accusump also provides pre lubrication for prevent dry starts.

As for oil temps, in general, they tend to run higher (15-25F) than the water temps. Because the M96 has a laminar flow water/oil heat exchanger, it serves to both pull heat out when warmed up, and warm up the oil when cold. Unfortunately, because of the OEM 185 F stat and the pockets of high coolant temps inherent in these engines, it is not uncommon for the Boxster to run actual coolant temps in the 215-220 F range (your dash gauge is both notoriously inaccurate and non linear), meaning the oil can be getting very hot. If you really want to protect your engine, lowering the coolant temp by using the LN 160 F stat would be an excellent move, and adding the “S” cooler if you have a base engine (the S cooler is more than twice the size of the base cooler and is a great $200 DIY project). The stat will bring the coolant down to the 175-185 F range and drop the oil to a little over 200 F, which is a really great move……………
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Old 10-21-2009, 12:13 PM   #6
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hmmm the tstat sounds good obviously and eventually maybe i will invest in an accusump since a full dry sump seems steep
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Old 10-21-2009, 12:26 PM   #7
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hmmm the tstat sounds good obviously and eventually maybe i will invest in an accusump since a full dry sump seems steep
A true dry sump is not only expensive, but where are you going to put it, the tank and lines? They are not exactly small either...............

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