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Old 11-04-2010, 10:12 PM   #1
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Need advice - cut rubber boot on lower control arm ball joint

Tonight, I decided to replace a bad wheel bearing on my 97 986 and managed to slice open the rubber boot on the passenger side lower control arm ball joint (see image below, ball joint is circled in red). I was attempting to remove the bearing carrier and hub, so I could take it to a local shop and have them press out the out bearings and press in the new bearings, since I did not have the SIR tool. Unfortunately, because of lack of clearance, I ended up having to use one of those cheesy fork looking ball joint tools, which ended up slicing the rubber.

There are two tears in the rubber, I am curious if there is an acceptable method of repairing the rubber boot, in order to protect the ball joint from the elements. If not, is it possible to replace just the ball joint or do I have to replace the entire control arm? Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

ubii
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Last edited by ubii; 11-04-2010 at 10:15 PM.
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Old 11-05-2010, 02:57 AM   #2
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When you're using a pickle fork to separate a press fit, even if you grease the hell out of it before you start, it's easy to tear them. There is no way to repair that rubber bushing with enough efficacy to resist the re installation.

If it were my Porsche, I'd eat it and buy a new piece. However, the ball joint can likely give you many more miles of wear regardless of the tear. It will likely fail prematurely, that is especially true if you run where they use corrosives on the roads for winter, like in NY.
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Old 11-05-2010, 04:05 AM   #3
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You must replace the whole lower control arm. If you are caught between a rock and a hard place than you can pack the slices with wheel bearing grease and put it back togather. It will take some time for the grease to wash out at wich time you can replace the part.
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Old 11-05-2010, 05:00 AM   #4
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With a little patience you can weld it back together. Grease the inside first, then clean the brake with some lacquer thinner or brake fluid. Using a small type soildering iron, melt to 2 pieces back together. Also, you can go to an auto parts store and get a ball joint dust cover. Did the same thing on my Nissan changing out a CV axle. The dust cover covers the whole ball joint and when completed made a very nice tight seal.
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Old 11-05-2010, 05:39 AM   #5
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There are reasons why these tools exist, and you just discovered one of them. I would plan on replacing the arm.....
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Old 11-05-2010, 09:12 AM   #6
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There are reasons why these tools exist, and you just discovered one of them. I would plan on replacing the arm.....

Trust me, if it had not been the middle of the night, I would have went out and bought one of these, instead of using the other tool. I was trying to get everything done as quickly as possible, as I needed the car back on the road today.
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Old 11-05-2010, 12:18 PM   #7
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All the more reason to be sure you have all the correct tools before starting a project, otherwise you end up taking longer than necessary, creating more problems, and sometimes getting to do it all over again the next day.............
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Old 11-05-2010, 01:34 PM   #8
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I wouldnt worry about packing it with any more grase. Just clean the damaged surface and use some black RTV silicone or such to patch it. Worked like a charm on my audi A6.
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Old 11-06-2010, 08:05 AM   #9
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Not sure how it would work on this because it's flexes so much but good old krazy glue on ruber "o" rings works beatifully. In fact, for super high tech laboratory applications, "o"ring material is sold by the foot and trimmed to fit and sealed with a drop of crazy glue.

I think though, again, the previous post might work better because of it's flexibility.

yelojkt has a good Idea 2. Since you will have to buy a new on someday, do what you can and drive it till yo have to replace.

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Old 11-06-2010, 08:15 PM   #10
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I ended up doing what al83s suggested and used some black RTV to patch it and after driving it around all day, it seems to be holding up very well. I will be replacing my front and rear brake pads in the next week or two and will check out the condition of the ball joint at that time. If I discover that it has torn open, I will replace the control arm and if it is still good, I will check it again in the spring. Thanks again for everyone's input, I appreciate it.

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Old 06-10-2014, 11:35 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by JFP in PA View Post


There are reasons why these tools exist, and you just discovered one of them. I would plan on replacing the arm.....
Would this not tear the boot as well or is it a special for Porsche control arms? Mine are being hammered apart to avoid the tear...ahhh! Looks like this might avoid grabbing the bottom part of the boot
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Old 06-10-2014, 03:05 PM   #12
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I did the same thing when replacing the rear wheel bearings. Went ahead and replaced both lower control arms.
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Old 06-11-2014, 03:15 AM   #13
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i dont think jfp would post a pic of a tool that would rip the boot.....fwiw imho a ball joint with a ripped boot wont last very long and attempts to repair the rip are almost never successful
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Old 06-11-2014, 02:07 PM   #14
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JFP....is this tool the magic unicorn that we seek?
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Old 06-11-2014, 03:17 PM   #15
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seal it with polyurethane roofing caulk , works great . ask me how I know ?
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Old 06-11-2014, 03:18 PM   #16
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oh, and Harbor freight is your best friend with these type of projects .
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Old 06-11-2014, 03:29 PM   #17
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Okay so Harbour Freight ( we don't have that up here ) has a tool with right size fork so as to clear the boot??
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Old 06-11-2014, 04:59 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by opus69 View Post
I did the same thing when replacing the rear wheel bearings. Went ahead and replaced both lower control arms.

Does it required to adjust/wheel alignment when after installing new lower Control/coffin arm?
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