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-   -   SS brake lines... fluid flush inquiry (http://986forum.com/forums/boxster-general-discussions/73519-ss-brake-lines-fluid-flush-inquiry.html)

Starter986 10-15-2018 09:33 AM

SS brake lines... fluid flush inquiry
 
I'm going to flush my brake fluid... read/saw the instructions/directions ready to proceed. Waiting on the ordered Motive bleeder.

I'm also going to install SS brake lines. I'll remove the brake fluid cover and remove/install the lines trying to mitigate fluid going all over the place. Waiting on the flare nut wrench set.

My inquiry...

Should first I install the new lines then flushing the fluid with new? Or... flush the fluid with new... install the new lines... then "top off" the fluid?

I appreciate any guidance, tips, and tricks. Thank you.

jaykay 10-15-2018 09:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Starter986 (Post 581053)
I'm going to flush my brake fluid... read/saw the instructions/directions ready to proceed. Waiting on the ordered Motive bleeder.

I'm also going to install SS brake lines. I'll remove the brake fluid cover and remove/install the lines trying to mitigate fluid going all over the place. Waiting on the flare nut wrench set.

My inquiry...

Should first I install the new lines then flushing the fluid with new? Or... flush the fluid with new... install the new lines... then "top off" the fluid?

I appreciate any guidance, tips, and tricks. Thank you.

I think you would be wasting time and fluid flushing before hand unless there is some specific reason. You are going to lose a lot of fluid during the bleeding process ......might as well combine the flush and bleed after the line change....just my opinion

steved0x 10-15-2018 10:18 AM

One trick when opening the brake lines, for example to install ss brake lines or to rebuild a caliper, put a jackstand or something in the car and set it so that it pushes the brake pedal, this seems to close off the line at the top (similar to holding your finger on the end of a straw) and it minimizes the amount of fluid that leaks out.

I would replace the SS lines, and then do your flush, as adding the SS lines will introduce a lot of air into the system and will require a major bleed after.

Starter986 10-15-2018 10:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by steved0x (Post 581063)
One trick when opening the brake lines, for example to install ss brake lines or to rebuild a caliper, put a jackstand or something in the car and set it so that it pushes the brake pedal, this seems to close off the line at the top (similar to holding your finger on the end of a straw) and it minimizes the amount of fluid that leaks out.

I would replace the SS lines, and then do your flush, as adding the SS lines will introduce a lot of air into the system and will require a major bleed after.

Thank you for that tip! OK... the "air"...

Should I be concerned about that "air" compromising any brake modules or whathaveyou... necessitating bringing it to a mechanic to clear any codes associated with ABS or other brake technology?

My approach will be to prepare the car... have all the tool(s) in order and ready... then removing the existing rubber lines... installing the SS lines... then bleeding. When installing the new lines should I start from the furthest line working forward? Anything which I should consider or otherwise be aware of before I commence? I'm not a fan of surprises. :cool:

Thank you!

rfuerst911sc 10-15-2018 10:47 AM

It's possible that you will have to bleed the clutch slave cylinder . Just keep that in mind if you bleed the brakes and the clutch feels " funny " .

steved0x 10-15-2018 10:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Starter986 (Post 581065)

Should I be concerned about that "air" compromising any brake modules or whathaveyou... necessitating bringing it to a mechanic to clear any codes associated with ABS or other brake technology?

I don't think so, I think the ABS modules and TC/PSM are "upstream" of the brake lines. I think those get air if folks let the brake fluid reservoir get too low when bleeding/flushing and push air down into the lines from the top. Also can happen when changing the master cylinder.


Quote:

Originally Posted by Starter986 (Post 581065)

My approach will be to prepare the car... have all the tool(s) in order and ready... then removing the existing rubber lines... installing the SS lines... then bleeding. When installing the new lines should I start from the furthest line working forward? Anything which I should consider or otherwise be aware of before I commence? I'm not a fan of surprises. :cool:

Thank you!

I think you could change the lines in any order. Then when done bleed/flush from the furthest working to closest.

I tried to do mine way back using some cheap amazon flare wrenches and they didn't inspire confidence. I then got 2 used snap-on flare wrenches from ebay covering 9-12 mm and have had better luck with those.

Some of the fittings are probably going to be on there very tight so be aware of that.

I put on stainless lines a few years back, and both fronts subsequently failed right above where it joined to the caliper hardline (one failed in my driveway, and the 2nd one failed in the parking lot at the hotel when I was at Road Atlanta, thank goodness it didn't fail when I was on track), I think because I had twisted them to get the flared ends that hold it in place to line up. So loosely test fit your lines, I thought they were symmetrical but there might just be "one way" that they go one. It may have been that I just had a cheap/wrong brand, I bought them from someone that never installed them, so who knows what brand they were, how old they were etc... I have since got back to ATE brand OEM style rubber lines :) They have been working out for me.

I think I must have gotten some bad/wrong ones or I somehow installed them very wrong, as I don't know of anyone else that had this problem. So don't let that scare you, but if something feels wrong or you have to twist the line a lot to get it to line up, stop and see if there is a different way.

Starter986 10-15-2018 10:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rfuerst911sc (Post 581067)
It's possible that you will have to bleed the clutch slave cylinder . Just keep that in mind if you bleed the brakes and the clutch feels " funny " .

Tiptronic. Does that make it easier? :confused:

paulofto 10-15-2018 01:02 PM

I just did exactly what you are about to do back in July using Stoptech SS lines. In addition I installed new pads all around while in there.. The process I followed was to swap out each line, swap out each set of pads, and, using a Motive bleeder, bleed each caliber starting with the furthest working up to the closest. Since I have a 6 speed I also bled the clutch.

You will lose quite a bit of fluid when swapping the lines so be prepared with plenty of rags. You will also get more air out then if simply bleeding. Be very gentle loosening the brake lines nuts and only use a proper sized flare nut wrench also on the bleeders. You do not want to round off or strip these nuts. And ensue they are tightened but not overly so.

All in all it is a very simple but potentially messy job so take your time. The assistance of a friend to watch the Motive bleeder fluid level is helpful since you don't want air introduced into the system.

Good luck!

Starter986 10-15-2018 01:03 PM

Thank you to everyone for instilling in me the confidence to proceed. I love this forum!:cheers:

rfuerst911sc 10-15-2018 02:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Starter986 (Post 581071)
Tiptronic. Does that make it easier? :confused:

Sorry I missed that it was a tip , slave cylinder not an issue .

911monty 10-15-2018 02:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Starter986 (Post 581071)
Tiptronic. Does that make it easier? :confused:

Okay Since you actually asked this question I will be the lone dissenter. I'm offering this as sincerely as possible. Your brakes are the ultimate safety system on your car and can result in severe injury to yourself and the public if not done properly. My recommendation to you is to pay an indy to do this, it will be well worth the 1 hr. What are you going to do if you twist off a caliper line? Maybe the indy will let you watch and you can do next time. Otherwise, since you don't track your car having a Motive bleeder sitting around for two years with brake fluid in it, it may not even work next time you want to use it. Got someone with experience that wants to help you then great, otherwise let a pro do it. Good Luck and best wishes however you elect to proceed.

911monty 10-15-2018 02:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Starter986 (Post 581053)
I'm going to flush my brake fluid... read/saw the instructions/directions ready to proceed. Waiting on the ordered Motive bleeder.


My inquiry...

Should first I install the new lines then flushing the fluid with new? Or... flush the fluid with new... install the new lines... then "top off" the fluid?

I appreciate any guidance, tips, and tricks. Thank you.

This question conveys a fundamental lack of understanding of how a hydraulic system works and is dangerous.

Again no offense but sometimes a man just has to know his limitations.

Starter986 10-15-2018 04:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 911monty (Post 581086)
This question conveys a fundamental lack of understanding of how a hydraulic system works and is dangerous.

Again no offense but sometimes a man just has to know his limitations.

Okay Since you actually asked this question I will be the lone dissenter. I'm offering this as sincerely as possible. Your brakes are the ultimate safety system on your car and can result in severe injury to yourself and the public if not done properly. My recommendation to you is to pay an indy to do this, it will be well worth the 1 hr. What are you going to do if you twist off a caliper line? Maybe the indy will let you watch and you can do next time. Otherwise, since you don't track your car having a Motive bleeder sitting around for two years with brake fluid in it, it may not even work next time you want to use it. Got someone with experience that wants to help you then great, otherwise let a pro do it. Good Luck and best wishes however you elect to proceed.

OK. Dirty Harry. ;) I do know my limitations, and is why precisely I turn to the forum. Bleeding brakes... swapping brake lines... not exactly rocket science... which is why I inquired about the preliminary steps to swaping the lines and then bleeding the brakes.

I've watched several vids to replace lines/bleed the system and, in my younger days, bled a few brakes absent a bleeder... and survived to tell about it. I restored my 86 bim through books, vids, and a couple of forums... so I'm fairly confident in my ability to wrench.

I would exercise extreme caution and diligence when removing the existing lines (I'd be in no hurry).

Trust me... I do listen to you guys, and wouldn't attempt the swap without first consulting with you pros.

That said... I could just refresh the fluid... properly bleeding the brakes... and wait on the SS install until the day I HAVE TO bring the car to a shop.

Your primary concern (and I thank you for that) is I might break or tear or FU something beyond my ability. This is the reason why I would take my time... and follow proper procedure.

Sincerely I value opinion and instruction.

In conclusion, and I'll follow your lead... Go? Or no go?

Thanks!

husker boxster 10-15-2018 04:56 PM

GO GO GO GO
(was only going to say 1 GO but forum requires 10 letters per post)

dlud 10-15-2018 06:28 PM

I agree: do it. Change out all the lines and then bleed each wheel in the prescribed order. I commend you for asking the question.

Gilles 10-15-2018 06:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by husker boxster (Post 581095)
GO GO GO GO
(was only going to say 1 GO but forum requires 10 letters per post)

IMHO, Yes..!

If you have done it in the past, still the same basics just take your time and perhaps add as well soaking the bleeders for a couple of days (prior), with PB Blaster or similar to loose a possibly stubborn bleeder.

911's suggests also a 'volunteer club mentor' to safety check your work while enjoying a beer (kindly provided by you..) :p , but feel pretty sure that someone from the forum that lives in the same area, may he offer to help, just ask :)

This is an awesome forum.

paulofto 10-15-2018 09:27 PM

I know you mentioned watching videos of brake line changes but I'm not sure if you saw this one which I found to be quite helpful.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Czvr1_lNZew

Starter986 10-16-2018 05:59 AM

So it's a go. Thank you all for the votes of confidence.

I'm Palm Springs proximate. I'd like to bang this out along with the water pump... LTT, oil pressure valve upgrade... motor mount... S oil cooler.

Who is local enough to assist/examine my handiwork with the brake lines? I could visit you and, yes, I'd bring beer and a pizza.

Thank you, fellas...


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