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-   -   Clay Bar (http://986forum.com/forums/boxster-general-discussions/4215-clay-bar.html)

blinkwatt 11-09-2005 09:24 PM

Clay Bar
 
I was wondering if there are many differences in clay bars? I was looking into claying my car this weekend but I do not know how much it will help. I saw a Mothers kit including the clay bar,instant detailer(lubricant) and wax included for $17,has anyone used it? Is there really a difference between Meguair's or Mother's clay bars?

RandallNeighbour 11-09-2005 09:31 PM

I've used the meguire's product you've mentioned, and it worked very well. Just remember to keep the paint surface VERY wet as you lightly rub the clay bar across it or you'll be leaving clay residue behind.

Groit's sells what they call a "superior" clay bar, but I thought the meguire's did a mighty fine job.

BTW-the detailing spray is really good stuff for a quick clean up when you don't have time to wash your car and makes a klasse'd car VERY shiney!

ukchris 11-09-2005 09:42 PM

I'm no expert but I did ask that same question a while back and was told they are all pretty much the same. Do heed the warnings though, you can scratch your car if you get some grit or other nasty and not enough lubricant.

One aside though, clay is fantastic for cleaning windows. Use a different piece and keep it for the glass only but it really gets all the crud off.

Chris.

MNBoxster 11-09-2005 10:00 PM

HI,

Traditionally, Clay Bars are made from a mixture of a clay base (polybutene) and various abrasives.

The primary detailing clay patent (U.S. Patent No. 5,727,993) identifies three unique elements (claim 57) used in concert:

ďA method of polishing a protrusion or stain from a surface comprising;

applying a plastic flexible tool to the surface, the plastic flexible tool comprising a plastic flexible material (Detail Clay) having mixed therewith an abrasive comprising grains from about 3 to 50 m in diameter and;

applying a force to the plastic flexible tool such that a polishing force per area is applied by the plastic flexible tool to a protrusion or stain on the surface, and such that the amount of force per area applied to the surface is less than the amount of force per area applied to the protrusion or stain.Ē

Typical composition of Detailing Clay will be:

Polybutylene
20% - 40%

Calcium Carbonate
(in the form of Diatomaceous Earth - Fossilized Diatoms)
40% - 60%

Silica
10% - 30%

Pigments/Soluble materials (Trade Secrets)
< 5%


One way to think about Detailing Clay is : Detailing Clay is a Selective Polish with a built-in Applicator. Its job is to polish away Dirt and Surface Contamination from Paint, Glass, Chrome and Plastic without polishing the surface itself. Detailing Clay technology has been around for many years, with roots dating back to the 1930ís. Thatís when the idea of combining Polybutene (a soft plastic resin material) with Abrasives was first conceived.

So, you see, Detailing Clay is an Abrasive system. If not used properly, detailing clay can cause light surface marring. Thereís no need to fear if you use proper lubrication.

Although most of the clay made today comes out of a single factory in Japan, the formulas can be significantly different, including:

- Clay resin density (firmness)
- Abrasive particle size
- Type of abrasive
- Abrasive density (ratio of abrasive to clay)
- Color

Detailing Clay formulation determines the optimal function of the Clay as well as its potential to do damage when used improperly.

As an example, Professional Grade Clay thatís designed to remove paint overspray is very firm and contains abrasives equivalent to Heavy Rubbing Compound. Used properly it will remove heavy overspray without damaging the paint. Used improperly, it can leave some pretty significant surface marring. Thatís why itís a Professional Product.

Most Consumer grade Detailing Clays are designed to be used as an Annual Paint Maintenance Tool prior to polishing and waxing. At this frequency, these Detailing Clay products work great. Simply use the Clay as part of your Annual Major Detailing Regimen. One problem is that many Car Enthusiasts Clay their vehicles with greater frequency; as often as monthly. At this rate of use, Consumer grade Detailing Clay can begin to dull clear coat finishes. After all, it is an abrasive!

I use the Mother's System for years and have good results. The key is to use lots of lubrication. Don't use the Detailing Spray often recommended, use a Spray Bottle with either a Capful of Carwash Soap or a Capful of Glycerin (available from a Pharmacy) added to Distilled Water, these will provide much better lubrication and reduce your chances of marring the paint when used LIBERALLY. Despite Claims, only use a CLay Bar once and then throw it away. $15 for a new Clay Bar is considerably more advantageous than $8000 for a new Paint Job... Hope this helps...

Happy Motoring!... Jim'99

SD987 11-09-2005 10:06 PM

I've used both and they've produced similar results. If it's your first time, don't forget that waxing isn't optional (which is why they include wax in the package) and for god's sake, wear a condom !

Also, be sure your car will really benefit from it. After you wash it, run your hand on the paint...if the freshly washed paint feels gritty, it could probably benefit from it but remember clay is best for removing the stuff you can't see, not the stuff you can see.

I second Randall's opinion about the detailer spray being good on it's own, but would be hesitant on using it on an unwashed car (despite the name quick-detailer). If using the detailer spray on it's own, be sure to read the instructions on the detailer bottle. During the claying process it acts as a lubricant, but when used on it's own it should be sprayed on a smallish section, spread evenly with a buffing pad or towel and then buffed off with a dry side of the towel (similar to waxing). Spraying and then starting to rub it off will produce streaky and uneven results.

MNBoxster 11-09-2005 10:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SD987
I've used both and they've produced similar results. If it's your first time, don't forget that waxing isn't optional (which is why they include wax in the package) and for god's sake, wear a condom !

Also, be sure your car will really benefit from it. After you wash it, run your hand on the paint...if the freshly washed paint feels gritty, it could probably benefit from it but remember clay is best for removing the stuff you can't see, not the stuff you can see.

I second Randall's opinion about the detailer spray being good on it's own, but would be hesitant on using it on an unwashed car (despite the name quick-detailer). If using the detailer spray on it's own, be sure to read the instructions on the detailer bottle. During the claying process it acts as a lubricant, but when used on it's own it should be sprayed on a smallish section, spread evenly with a buffing pad or towel and then buffed off with a dry side of the towel (similar to waxing). Spraying and then starting to rub it off will produce streaky and uneven results.

Hi,

I don't like the Detailing Sprays at all. As Lubricants for Clay work, they're not as effective as simply CarWash Soap or Glycerin with Distilled Water.

I HATE them for between Washing Spruce-Ups, because your Car will often have fine Abrasive Particles of Iron (Rail Dust), Brake Dust, etc. clinging to the Paintwork. When you spray the Detailing Spray and then Rub it off/in, you literally rub these Abrasives into the Paint as well. People who frequently use Detailing Spray often have loads of minute scratches as well. You really can't Wash a car without actually Washing it...

Happy Motoring!... Jim'99

Perfectlap 11-10-2005 07:42 AM

my understanding is that all clay bars are made by the same manufacturer and rebranded by different companies.
I use Sonus and tried their new soft clay recently which is supposed to b easier for more frequent claying, so as not to strip the underlying wax.

I never wax without claying first, usually clay after washing. So I do it often.

donv 11-10-2005 04:15 PM

Just picked up some new clay as part of an order from SportsCarCare.com:

Clay Magic claybar kit (1 @ 10.95) 10.95

"Clay Bar Made in Japan" plus detailing spray. Can't beat the price. I highly recommend the site as well, like the ordering process and the shipping is both reasonable and *fast*.

my89_928gt 11-10-2005 10:31 PM

I use Auto Magic products.
I have learned when I bought my clay bar from them that with a black(or dark finsh) to use the blue bar only. It is not as abrasive as their red bar.
Their spray lub is very good.
You guy's with black car's will like their wax also. It dose not dry white and show off all you scratches:)
This stuff hides the small light scratches and makes the bigger ones less noticable.
On top of that it gives that black car a great wet looking shine.
With most waxes that I have used, if you touch it their is a nice grease looking print left behind. With this stuff their is none to a light print left behind.
I have used several different waxes over the years and just love this Automagic past wax on my black Boxster.
Sorry, don't mean to sound like a salesman-I'm not.

Richard
97 Boxster 5sp black 94k miles -all most ready. Shop said should be ready Fri.


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